How to Create a Bones Text Effect in Adobe Illustrator

Post pobrano z: How to Create a Bones Text Effect in Adobe Illustrator

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

In the following steps you will learn how to create a simple bones text effect in Adobe Illustrator. 

For starters, you will learn how to set up a simple grid and how to create several pixel-perfect shapes. Using the Rounded Corners effect and some basic vector shape-building techniques, you will learn how to create the main bone shape. Moving on, you will learn how to save and use an art brush. For the final touches, you will learn how to add Drop Shadow effects and a simple background.

For more inspiration on how to adjust or improve your final text effect, you can find plenty of resources at GraphicRiver.

1. How to Create a New Document and Set Up a Grid

Hit Control-N to create a new document. Select Pixels from the Units drop-down menu, enter 850 in the width box and 600 in the height box, and then click that More Settings button. Select RGB for the Color Mode, set the Raster Effects to Screen (72 ppi), and then click Create Document.

Enable the Grid (View > Show Grid) and the Snap to Grid (View > Snap to Grid). You will need a grid every 5 px, so simply go to Edit > Preferences > Guides & Grid, and enter 5 in the Gridline every box and 1 in the Subdivisions box. Try not to get discouraged by all that grid—it will make your work easier, and keep in mind that you can easily enable or disable it using the Control-„ keyboard shortcut.

You can learn more about Illustrator’s grid system in this short tutorial by Andrei Stefan: Understanding Adobe Illustrator’s Grid System.

You should also open the Info panel (Window > Info) for a live preview with the size and position of your shapes. Don’t forget to set the unit of measurement to pixels from Edit > Preferences > Units. All these options will significantly increase your work speed.

setup grid

2. How to Create the Bone Shape and Pattern Brush

Step 1

Pick the Rectangle Tool (M) and focus on your Toolbar. Remove the color from the stroke and then select the fill and set its color to R=253 G=241 B=193. Move to your artboard and simply create a 25 x 105 px rectangle—the grid and the Snap to Grid feature should help.

Focus on the bottom side of this rectangle and switch to the Direct Selection Tool (A). Select the right anchor point and drag it 5 px to the left, and then select the left anchor point and drag it 5 px up and 5 px to the right.

rectangle tool

Step 2

Keep focusing on the bottom side of your existing shape. Using the Rectangle Tool (M), create a 30 x 35 px shape and place it as shown in the first image. Focus on the left side of this new rectangle and pick the Add Anchor Point Tool (+). Simply click in the point highlighted with blue to add a new anchor point for your shape.

Switch to the Direct Selection Tool (A), select the newly added anchor point and drag it 15 px to the left. Move to the right side of this shape and make sure that the Direct Selection Tool (A) remains active. Select the top anchor point and drag it 10 px down, and then select the bottom anchor point and drag it 10 px up and 5 px to the left.

add anchor point

Step 3

Using the Rectangle Tool (M), create a 25 px square and place it as shown in the first image. Focus on the bottom side of this new shape, pick the Add Anchor Point Tool (+) and add a new anchor point as shown below.

Keep focusing on your square and switch to the Direct Selection Tool (A). First, select the bottom-left anchor point and drag it 10 px up and 5 px to the left. Move to the bottom-right anchor point and drag it 5 px up, and then select the top-right anchor point and drag it 5 px up and 10 px to the left.

direct selection tool

Step 4

Using the Rectangle Tool (M), create a 40 x 30 px shape and place it as shown in the first image. Pick the Add Anchor Point Tool (+) and add the two anchor points shown below.

Keep focusing on this new rectangle and switch to the Direct Selection Tool (A). First, select the bottom-left anchor point and drag it 5 px up. Move to the top-right anchor point and drag it 10 px to the left, and then select the top-left anchor point and drag it 5 px to the right.

rectangle

Step 5

Using the Rectangle Tool (M), create a 35 px square and place it as shown in the first image. Pick the Add Anchor Point Tool (+) and add the two anchor points shown below.

Keep focusing on your square and switch to the Direct Selection Tool (A). First, select the bottom-right anchor point and drag it 10 px up and 5 px to the left. Move to the top-right anchor point and drag it 5 px down, and then select the top-left anchor point and drag it 25 px down.

rectangle

Step 6

Select all the shapes made so far, open the Pathfinder panel (Window > Pathfinder), and click the Unite button. Make sure that the resulting shape is filled with R=253 G=241 B=193 and move to the next step.

unite

Step 7

Make sure that your shape is still selected and go to Effect > Stylize > Rounded Corners. Enter a 5 px Radius, click OK, and then go to Object > Expand Appearance.

rounded corners

Step 8

Pick the Pen Tool (P) and create three simple triangles as shown in the first image. Select all the shapes made so far and click the Minus Front button from the Pathfinder panel.

minus front

Step 9

Make sure that your shape is selected, open the Brushes panel (Window > Brushes) and click that New Brush button. Select the Art Brush box and then click OK. Pick a name for your brush, drag that Width slider to 50%, enter the rest of the attributes shown in the following image, and then click the OK button.

art brush

3. How to Create the Text Effect

Step 1

Pick the Type Tool (T) and open the Character panel (Window > Type > Character). Select the Bonez font and then set the size to 150 px and the tracking to 100. Simply click on your artboard and add some text. Make it black (R=0 G=0 B=0) and lower its Opacity to about 30%.

type tool

Step 2

Disable the Grid (Control-„) and the Snap to Grid (Shift-Control-„).

Pick the Brush Tool (B) and select your art brush from the Brushes panel. Use that black text as a rough reference and start drawing paths to create the first letter.

brush tool

Step 3

Move to the next letters and use the same art brush. Once you’re done, delete that piece of text.

ABCD

Step 4

Select all the paths made so far and go to Effect > Stylize > Drop Shadow. Enter the attributes shown in the following image and then click OK.

drop shadow

Step 5

Make sure that all your paths are still selected, Group them (Control-G) and then go to Effect > Stylize > Drop Shadow. Enter the attributes shown below and then click OK.

group

4. How to Create the Background

Step 1

Pick the Ellipse Tool (L) and simply click on your artboard to open the Ellipse window. Set the Width to 600 px and the Height to 360 px and then click OK. Fill the resulting shape with R=235 G=107 B=38 and send it to back (Shift-Control-[).

Make sure that this orange shape stays selected and open the Align panel (Window > Align). Set the aligning to Artboard (open the fly out menu and go to Show Options if you can’t see the Align To section as shown in the following image) and then click the Horizontal Align Center and Vertical Align Center buttons. This will basically bring your selected shape to the center of the artboard.

ellipse tool

Step 2

Make sure that your orange ellipse is still selected and go to Effect > Distort & Transform > Zig Zag. Enter the attributes shown in the following image and then click OK.

zig zag

Step 3

Pick the Rectangle Tool (M) and simply click on your artboard to open the Rectangle window. Set the Width to 860 px and the Height to 610 px and then click OK. Fill the resulting shape with R=39 G=9 B=62, send it to back (Shift-Control-[), and don’t forget to center it.

background

Congratulations! You’re Done!

Here is how it should look. I hope you’ve enjoyed this tutorial and can apply these techniques in your future projects. Don’t hesitate to share your final result in the comments section.

Feel free to adjust the final design and make it your own. You can find some great sources of inspiration at GraphicRiver, with interesting solutions to improve your design.

final product

7 Ways to Improve Sales at Your Shopify Storefront

Post pobrano z: 7 Ways to Improve Sales at Your Shopify Storefront
first image of the post

 

Shopify users have helped propel this storefront to iconic standing – enabling this shopping cart services provider to amass an impressive 115,000 new active storefronts over the past two years. It’s no mystery why retailers love using Shopify – the service makes it easy for just about anyone to get a professional-looking store up and running in a short matter of time. With a variety of premade free and premium templates to choose from, multichannel integration and dropship integrations, it’s never been faster or easier to start selling online.

But getting your store up on Shopify is just one part of the equation. Generating the sales you want while building your customer list is quite another. If you want more sales on Shopify, there are many tried and true methods. To help you get ahead of the game and improve your bottom line and ROI, here are 7 tried and true methods you can use that have been proven to increase sales exponentially.

Consider Using Premium Themes

Certainly, the free themes on Shopify aren’t bad. But with so many stores already using them, they are not all that unique, either. The key to really making your store stand out is with using premium themes. Your first stop should be at the official Shopify Theme Store – where you can connect with theme creators and designers to get a custom-made or premade premium theme for your store.  Another good place is Theme Forest – where you can browse thousands of awesome themes. You can also find premium themes for Shopify at places like Out of the Sandbox and many others.

Rethink Social Media Marketing

What social media marketing are you doing for your Shopify store? If you are just posting updates, blog roll posts or pictures of your products, you probably are not doing enough to really generate buzz. Instead, consider hosting contests and polls as well as showcasing your wares on Instagram and Pinterest via sponsored posts and pins. Also, explore your options with hiring social media management experts from places like UpWork or Fiverr – which offer services starting at just $5 and up.

Improve the Customer Journey with a Shopify CRM

Once your customers arrive at your store, what’s next? Perhaps they are looking at multiple channels? Maybe they’ve purchased a product from an eBay store you’ve run in the past or from your Amazon store? What about their order history, customer profile, notes and more? In order to truly improve the customer journey and get to know your market like never before, you’ll want to look into a cross-channel Shopify CRM software solution to help you piece together all your data—so you can improve loyalty and retention while enhancing the customer journey.

Expand Niche Products with Drop Shipping Options

Are you unable to carry a product inventory? Or do you feel that your existing inventory is being limited by your overall budget? You have some options here. Look into drop shipping services like Dropified or Oberlo. They offer millions of products that you can auto-import into your Shopify store and the margins are very lucrative. It’s an easy and fast way to expand your inventory and get more sales without having to worry about fulfillment or overhead.

Streamline Fulfillment & Returns Logistics

What about Fulfillment and returns logistics? You have lots of options these days with shipping software solutions and returns software. For fulfillment, consider software solutions like ReadyShipper X – which offers a multicarrier shipping solution. For returns, look to Shopify-friendly integrations like ReadyReturns, which automates your returns policy and works in tandem with ReadyShipper.

Also, make sure you look at the Shopify App Store to see all your options with products such as these. If your return and shipping volumes are low, you can always use Shopify’s included shipping and returns system. By making shipping and returns fast and easy for customers, you are 80% likelier to get more sales and earn repeat business, according to UPS.

Add Integrated Reviews & Digital Coupons

Don’t overlook the power of integrated reviews and digital coupons. More than 1 billion digital coupons were redeemed by smartphone users last year alone – and integrated reviews are a time-tested method of securing more conversions and improving customer loyalty. Shopify offers integrated apps for this, including YotPo for integrated customer reviews, and Better Coupon Box for easy digital coupons. Both will help you secure more social chatter, improve customer loyalty and trust, and will also help you improve your average order value exponentially.

 

Simple Patterns for Separation (Better Than Color Alone)

Post pobrano z: Simple Patterns for Separation (Better Than Color Alone)

Color is pretty good for separating things. That’s what your basic pie chart is, isn’t it? You tell the slices apart by color. With enough color contrast, you might be OK, but you might be even better off (particularly where accessibility is concerned) using patterns, or a combination.

Patrick Dillon tackled the Pie Chart thing

Enhancing Charts With SVG Patterns:

When one of the slices is filled with something more than color, it’s easier to figure out [who the Independents are]:

See the Pen Political Party Affiliation – #2 by Patrick Dillon (@pdillon) on CodePen.

Filling a pie slice with a pattern is not a common charting library feature (yet), but if your library of choice is SVG-based, you are free to implement SVG patterns.

As in, literally a <pattern /> in SVG!

Here’s a simple one for horizontal lines:

<pattern 
    id="horzLines" 
    width="8" 
    height="4" 
    patternUnits="userSpaceOnUse">
       <line 
          x1="0" 
          y1="0" 
          x2="8" 
          y2="0" 
         style="stroke:#999;stroke-width:1.5" 
       />
</pattern>

Now any SVG element can use that pattern as a fill. Even strokes. Here’s an example of mixed usage of two simple patterns:

See the Pen Simple Line Patterns by Chris Coyier (@chriscoyier) on CodePen.

That’s nice for filling SVG elements, but what about HTML elements?

Irene Ros created Pattern Fills that are SVG based, but usable in CSS also.

Using SVG Patterns as Fills:

There are several ways to use Pattern Fills:

  • You can use the patterns.css file that contains all the current patterns. That will only work for non-SVG elements.

  • You can use individual patterns, but copying them from the sample pages. CSS class definitions can be found here and SVG pattern defs can be found here

  • You can add your own patterns or modify mine! The conversion process from SVG document to pattern is very tedious. The purpose of the pattern fills toolchain is to simplify this process. You can clone the repo, run npm install and grunt dev to get a local server going. After that, any changes or additions to the src/patterns/**/* files will be automatically picked up and will re-render the CSS file and the sample pages. If you make new patterns, send them over in a pull request!

Here’s me applying them to SVG elements (but could just as easily be applied to HTML elements):

See the Pen Practical Patterns by Chris Coyier (@chriscoyier) on CodePen.

The CSS usage is as base64 data URLs though, so once they are there they aren’t super duper manageable/changeable.

Here’s Irene with an old timey chart, using d3:

Managing an SVG pattern in CSS

If your URL encode the SVG just right, you and plop it right into CSS and have it remain fairly managable.

See the Pen Simple Line Patterns by Chris Coyier (@chriscoyier) on CodePen.

Other Examples Combining Color

Here’s one by John Schulz:

See the Pen SVG Colored Patterns by Chris Coyier (@chriscoyier) on CodePen.

Ricardo Marimón has an example creating the pattern in d3. The pattern looks largely the same on the slices, but perhaps it’s a start to modify.

Other Pattern Sources

We rounded a bunch of them up recently!


Simple Patterns for Separation (Better Than Color Alone) is a post from CSS-Tricks

How to Disable Links

Post pobrano z: How to Disable Links

The topic of disabling links popped up at my work the other day. Somehow, a „disabled” anchor style was added to our typography styles last year when I wasn’t looking. There is a problem though: there is no real way to disable an <a> link (with a valid href attribute) in HTML. Not to mention, why would you even want to? Links are the basis of the web.

At a certain point, it looked like my co-workers were not going to accept this fact, so I started thinking of how this could be accomplished. Knowing that it would take a lot, I wanted to prove that it was not worth the effort and code to support such an unconventional interaction, but I feared that by showing it could be done they would ignore all my warnings and just use my example as proof that it was OK. This hasn’t quite shaken out for me yet, but I figured we could go through my research.

First, things first:

Just don’t do it.

A disabled link is not a link, it’s just text. You need to rethink your design if it calls for disabling a link.

Bootstrap has examples of applying the .disabled class to anchor tags, and I hate them for it. At least they mention that the class only provides a disabled style, but this is misleading. You need to do more than just make a link look disabled if you really want to disable it.

Surefire way: remove the href

If you have decided that you are going to ignore my warning and proceed with disabling a link, then removing the href attribute is the best way I know how.

Straight from the official Hyperlink spec:

The href attribute on a and area elements is not required; when those elements do not have href attributes they do not create hyperlinks.

An easier to understand definition from MDN:

This attribute may be omitted (as of HTML5) to create a placeholder link. A placeholder link resembles a traditional hyperlink, but does not lead anywhere.

Here is basic JavaScript code to set and remove the href attribute:

/* 
 * Use your preferred method of targeting a link
 *
 * document.getElementById('MyLink');
 * document.querySelector('.link-class');
 * document.querySelector('[href="https://unfetteredthoughts.net"]');
 */
// "Disable" link by removing the href property
link.href = '';
// Enable link by setting the href property
link.href = 'https://unfetteredthoughts.net';

Styling this via CSS is also pretty straightforward:

a {
  /* Disabled link styles */
}
a:link, a:visited { /* or a[href] */
  /* Enabled link styles */
}

That’s all you need to do!

That’s not enough, I want something more complex so that I can look smarter!

If you just absolutely have to over-engineer some extreme solution, here are some things to consider. Hopefully, you will take heed and recognize that what I am about to show you is not worth the effort.

First, we need to style our link so that it looks disabled.

.isDisabled {
  color: currentColor;
  cursor: not-allowed;
  opacity: 0.5;
  text-decoration: none;
}
<a class="isDisabled" href="https://unfetteredthoughts.net">Disabled Link</a>

Setting color to currentColor should reset the font color back to your normal, non-link text color. I am also setting the mouse cursor to not-allowed to display a nice indicator on hover that the normal action is not allowed. Already, we have left out non-mouse users that can’t hover, mainly touch and keyboard, so they won’t get this indication. Next the opacity is cut to half. According to WCAG, disabled elements do not need to meet color contrast guidelines. I think this is very risky since it’s basically plain text at this point, and dropping the opacity in half would make it very hard to read for users with low-vision, another reason I hate this. Lastly, the text decoration underline is removed as this is usually the best indicator something is a link. Now this looks like a disabled link!

But it’s not really disabled! A user can still click/tap on this link. I hear you screaming about pointer-events.

.isDisabled {
  ...
  pointer-events: none;
}

Ok, we are done! Disabled link accomplished! Except, it’s only really disabled for mouse users clicking and touch users tapping. What about browsers that don’t support pointer-events? According to caniuse, this is not supported for Opera Mini and IE<11. IE11 and Edge actually don't support pointer-events unless display is set to block or inline-block. Also, setting pointer-events to none overwrites our nice not-allowed cursor, so now mouse users will not get that additional visual indication that the link is disabled. This is already starting to fall apart. Now we have to change our markup and CSS…

.isDisabled {
  cursor: not-allowed;
  opacity: 0.5;
}
.isDisabled > a {
  color: currentColor;
  display: inline-block;  /* For IE11/ MS Edge bug */
  pointer-events: none;
  text-decoration: none;
}
<span class="isDisabled"><a href="https://unfetteredthoughts.net">Disabled Link</a></span>

Wrapping the link in a <span> and adding the isDisabled class gives us half of our disabled visual style. A nice side-affect here is that the disabled class is now generic and can be used on other elements, like buttons and form elements. The actual anchor tag now has the pointer-events and text-decoration set to none.

What about keyboard users? Keyboard users will use the ENTER key to activate links. pointer-events are only for pointers, there is no keyboard-events. We also need to prevent activation for older browsers that don’t support pointer-events. Now we have to introduce some JavaScript.

Bring in the JavaScript

// After using preferred method to target link
link.addEventListener('click', function (event) {
  if (this.parentElement.classList.contains('isDisabled')) {
    event.preventDefault();
  }
});

Now our link looks disabled and does not respond to activation via clicks, taps, and the ENTER key. But we are still not done! Screen reader users have no way of knowing that this link is disabled. We need to describe this link as being disabled. The disabled attribute is not valid on links, but we can use aria-disabled="true".

<span class="isDisabled"><a href="https://unfetteredthoughts.net" aria-disabled="true">Disabled Link</a></span>

Now I am going to take this opportunity to style the link based on the aria-disabled attribute. I like using ARIA attributes as hooks for CSS because having improperly styled elements is an indicator that important accessibility is missing.

.isDisabled {
  cursor: not-allowed;
  opacity: 0.5;
}
a[aria-disabled="true"] {
  color: currentColor;
  display: inline-block;  /* For IE11/ MS Edge bug */
  pointer-events: none;
  text-decoration: none;
}

Now our links look disabled, act disabled, and are described as disabled.

Unfortunately, even though the link is described as disabled, some screen readers (JAWS) will still announce this as clickable. It does that for any element that has a click listener. This is because of developer tendency to make non-interactive elements like div and span as pseudo-interactive elements with a simple listener. Nothing we can do about that here. Everything we have done to remove any indication that this is a link is foiled by the assistive technology we were trying to fool, ironically because we have tried to fool it before.

But what if we moved the listener to the body?

document.body.addEventListener('click', function (event) {
  // filter out clicks on any other elements
  if (event.target.nodeName == 'A' && event.target.getAttribute('aria-disabled') == 'true') {
    event.preventDefault();
  }
});

Are we done? Well, not really. At some point we will need to enable these links so we need to add additional code that will toggle this state/behavior.

function disableLink(link) {
// 1. Add isDisabled class to parent span
  link.parentElement.classList.add('isDisabled');
// 2. Store href so we can add it later
  link.setAttribute('data-href', link.href);
// 3. Remove href
  link.href = '';
// 4. Set aria-disabled to 'true'
  link.setAttribute('aria-disabled', 'true');
}
function enableLink(link) {
// 1. Remove 'isDisabled' class from parent span
  link.parentElement.classList.remove('isDisabled');
// 2. Set href
  link.href = link.getAttribute('data-href');
// 3. Remove 'aria-disabled', better than setting to false
  link.removeAttribute('aria-disabled');
}

That’s it. We now have a disabled link that is visually, functionally, and semantically disabled for all users. It only took 10 lines of CSS, 15 lines of JavaScript (including 1 listener on the body), and 2 HTML elements.

Seriously folks, just don’t do it.


How to Disable Links is a post from CSS-Tricks

Agregator najlepszych postów o designie, webdesignie, cssie i Internecie