How to Use Procreate Layers

Post pobrano z: How to Use Procreate Layers

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

Procreate layers are a powerful tool for the digital artist—use them to separate, organize, preserve, and expand your work. There are a myriad of ways to use them, but we’ll start at the beginning with the fundamentals. Use this introduction to help you get started!

Follow along with us over on our Envato Tuts+ YouTube channel:

1. Getting Started With Procreate Layers

Step 1

If you’re unfamiliar, Procreate Layers work much like how they sound—they allow you to layer different pieces of content on top of each other, while maintaining a degree of independence. So, for example, I could draw something on one layer, and then create a new one for additional artwork. The two layers could then be moved and manipulated independently—as opposed to if they were one, dependent work in a shared space.

To reveal your Layers, tap on the Layers Icon in the upper right-hand corner of your work area.

Layers Icon

Step 2

By default, in a New Document, you’ll see two layers: Layer 1 and Background Color. Note that your selected layer is highlighted in blue.

We can create a New Layer by tapping the Plus Sign in our Layers Menu

Create a New Layer

Step 3

Swipe Left to reveal additional actions we can apply to our layers: Lock, Duplicate, and Delete.

Lock locks up the Layer so its contents are protected—you won’t be able to alter the contents until you Unlock them. You can Unlock your layers from this same location.

Duplicate creates a copy of the layer’s contents on a New Layer.

Delete deletes the selected layer. Note, if you only have one layer, you’ll see „Clear” instead of Delete, which will instead delete the layer’s contents.

Lock Duplicate and Delete Layers

Step 4

You can also rearrange your Procreate layers. To Move a Layer, Tap and Hold, and then Drag the Layer to the desired order.

Moving Layers

Step 5

Layers can also be grouped together. In this example, I have three layers. 

Swipe Right on the layers you would like to Group. Notice how the selected layers are highlighted in blue. Then, select the Group Icon in the upper right-hand corner.

Grouping Layers

Step 6

Here is what these layers look like grouped. In this example, the group is expanded, so we can see its contents. Tap on the Downwards Arrow to contract it and hide its contents.

Note that we can rearrange these layers within the group. You can also use this same method to move layers in and out of the group.

Swiping Left will give you the same Lock, Duplicate, and Delete options as you would see in a standard Procreate layer.

Example of Grouped Layers

Step 7

Procreate Layer Visibility can be Toggled On and Off via the check boxes on the right-hand side of each Layer. The same applies to Layer Groups and Layers within Groups. 

Layer Visibility

2. Layer Options in Procreate

Step 1

Tap on a layer to reveal additional options. Let’s start with some of the more straightforward ones:

  • Rename allows you to rename your layer. This is particularly useful for organizational purposes.
  • Select selects the contents of the layer.
  • Copy copies the contents of the layer. You can then paste the contents from the Actions panel. 
  • Fill Layer fills the entire layer with your active color.
  • Clear erases all of the contents of the selected layer.
  • Invert inverts your layer. So, for example, if I had a layer filled with the color black—and then I selected Invert—it would make the contents white.
  • Merge Down merges the layer down with the layer beneath it. The result is one merged layer.
  • Combine Down, on the other hand, merges the active layer and the layer beneath it into a Layer Group. 

Note, the visibility of these options can depend on the number of layers and/or their order. For example, if you only have one layer, you won’t see „Merge Down” or „Combine Down”. If you have Drawing Assist on, this can also be Toggled On or Off from these Layer Options.

Expanded Layer Options

Step 2

Now, let’s take a look at some of the more complicated options.

Alpha Lock locks the Layer’s Transparency

In this example, I have a layer called „Circle” with a purple circle in it. I then Toggled the Alpha Lock On

Now, I can draw within the purple circle area without worrying about going outside of my artwork—this is because the available drawing space has been locked to the area occupied by my original, purple circle. When I try to draw yellow lines, for example, they stay within the confines of the purple circle I’ve already drawn.

Alpha Lock

Step 3

Selecting Mask will attach a Procreate Layer Mask to the active layer. 

In this example, I’ve given the layer „Example” a Fill Color—it’s all green. Note the Layer Mask on top of it in the Layers panel, below.

When looking at the Mask Preview, the black space is hidden and the white space is visible. For example, the white dots in the Mask Preview are the only space where the green will be visible.

Layer Mask

Step 4

Procreate also has Clipping Masks, which we can access from our Layers—a similar but different way to mask your work. 

This time, as an example, create a shape of some kind on a layer of its own. 

Then, create a New Layer on top of this shape. Tap the layer preview and then select Clipping Mask. Now, this layer will act as a Clipping Mask—which means its visibility will be depending on the layer below it. 

In the example below, notice how I could not draw the red lines „outside” of the black circle. That’s because the red lines were drawn on my Clipping Mask—the layer above the black circle layer.

Procreate Clipping Mask

Step 5

Reference makes the active layer a Reference Layer. Procreate Reference Layers are often used to easily keep Line Art and Color Fills separate.

In this example, I’ve created some simple line art on a Layer I’ve called „Line Layer”. I selected Reference to make this into a Reference Layer.

Then, Create a New Layer—I’ve named it „Color Layer”. The layer above the Reference Layer is the one that will rely on said reference. So „Color Layer” is going to reference „Line Layer”.

Procreate Reference Layers make it very easy to add Fills to your Line Art while still keeping your lines independent, on their own layer. With my „Color Layer” selected, all I have to do is drag my active color into the space I’d like filled with color. 

Voila! It recognizes this space defined in my Reference Layer, yet keeps the color separate, on the above layer.

Reference Layer Example

3. Layer Opacity and Blending Modes in Procreate

Step 1

We can also alter the layer’s Blending Modes and the Procreate Layer Opacity. To view these options, click on the N that sits beside the Visibility Toggle.

Open Blending Mode and Opacity Options

Step 2

Right under our layer’s Preview, you’ll notice the Opacity Slider. 100% is full opacity, while 0% would be invisible. Procreate Layer Opacity can also be applied to Groups and Grouped Layers.

Layer Opacity

Step 3

Blending Modes affect how the layer interacts with the other Procreate layers in your composition. By default, the Blending Mode is set to Normal.

Procreate has a whole host of blending modes to try out, including: Multiply, Darken, Color Burn, Linear Burn, Darker Color, Normal, Lighten, Screen, Color Dodge, Add, Lighter Color, Overlay, Soft Light, Hard Light, Vivid Light, Linear Light, Pin Light, Hard Mix, Difference, Exclusion, Subtract, Divide, Hue, Saturation, Color, and Luminosity.

Yeah, that’s a lot! And one of the best ways to get to know blending modes is to jump right in and test them out. View them as different relationships your layers can have with one another—ways that they will literally blend with each other.

Remember, you can always set the Blending Mode back to Normal, to go back to the layer’s default look.

Let’s try a brief example. Below is some line art, on its own layer. Then, on a layer above it, there’s a solid color. Notice the difference between the same layer with different Blending Modes

On the left, the layer with the red color is set to Normal. In the middle, this same red layer is set to Lighten. On the right, this same layer’s Blending Mode is set to Multiply.

Try out the other ones too!

And There You Have It!

We’ve gone through the basics of Procreate layers. There’s plenty to experiment with and expand upon here—one of the best ways to get comfortable with Procreate layers is to jump right in and test them out! Good luck and happy drawing!

Example of Layer Application

Check Out These Premium Procreate Brushes

Looking for some new Procreate brushes to add to your collection? Check out these awesome brushes available now on Envato Elements. They would all make a wonderful addition to any illustrator’s set!

1. Shader Brushes for Procreate

This beautiful collection of 35 brushes is perfect for adding texture to your work. Test out the shaders, add hatching, and experiment with adding some noise to your work.

Shader Brushes for Procreate

2. Art Brushes for Procreate

Love real media? Try out these beautiful real media inspired brushes for Procreate. This collection of 21 brushes has so much to offer. Whether you’re looking for a little texture or a thick, painterly experience, this one is a must download.

Art Brushes for Procreate

3. Oil Paint Brushes for Procreate

Artist guerillacraft has made so many fantastic brushes—and his oil paint brush collection is no exception! 

Oil Paint Brushes for Procreate

4. Flower Touch Procreate Brushes

Isn’t this decorative brush set a treat? The preview is just the tip of the iceberg—there are over 160 different pieces to this set, including both pattern brushes and stamp brushes. Add some fun florals to your illustrative work today.

Flower Touch Procreate Brushes

5. Snow Brushes for Procreate

Whether you’re looking to add organic snowflakes to your work or to experiment with texture, this snow brush set for Procreate has a lot of content to explore. There are 16 brushes to experiment with and enjoy. Give them a try!

Snow Brushes for Procreate

Love Procreate and want to learn more? From creating and customizing brushes to illustration walk-throughs, check out these free Procreate tutorials on Envato Tuts+! Happy drawing!

How to Use Procreate Layers

Post pobrano z: How to Use Procreate Layers

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

Procreate layers are a powerful tool for the digital artist—use them to separate, organize, preserve, and expand your work. There are a myriad of ways to use them, but we’ll start at the beginning with the fundamentals. Use this introduction to help you get started!

Follow along with us over on our Envato Tuts+ YouTube channel:

1. Getting Started With Procreate Layers

Step 1

If you’re unfamiliar, Procreate Layers work much like how they sound—they allow you to layer different pieces of content on top of each other, while maintaining a degree of independence. So, for example, I could draw something on one layer, and then create a new one for additional artwork. The two layers could then be moved and manipulated independently—as opposed to if they were one, dependent work in a shared space.

To reveal your Layers, tap on the Layers Icon in the upper right-hand corner of your work area.

Layers Icon

Step 2

By default, in a New Document, you’ll see two layers: Layer 1 and Background Color. Note that your selected layer is highlighted in blue.

We can create a New Layer by tapping the Plus Sign in our Layers Menu

Create a New Layer

Step 3

Swipe Left to reveal additional actions we can apply to our layers: Lock, Duplicate, and Delete.

Lock locks up the Layer so its contents are protected—you won’t be able to alter the contents until you Unlock them. You can Unlock your layers from this same location.

Duplicate creates a copy of the layer’s contents on a New Layer.

Delete deletes the selected layer. Note, if you only have one layer, you’ll see „Clear” instead of Delete, which will instead delete the layer’s contents.

Lock Duplicate and Delete Layers

Step 4

You can also rearrange your Procreate layers. To Move a Layer, Tap and Hold, and then Drag the Layer to the desired order.

Moving Layers

Step 5

Layers can also be grouped together. In this example, I have three layers. 

Swipe Right on the layers you would like to Group. Notice how the selected layers are highlighted in blue. Then, select the Group Icon in the upper right-hand corner.

Grouping Layers

Step 6

Here is what these layers look like grouped. In this example, the group is expanded, so we can see its contents. Tap on the Downwards Arrow to contract it and hide its contents.

Note that we can rearrange these layers within the group. You can also use this same method to move layers in and out of the group.

Swiping Left will give you the same Lock, Duplicate, and Delete options as you would see in a standard Procreate layer.

Example of Grouped Layers

Step 7

Procreate Layer Visibility can be Toggled On and Off via the check boxes on the right-hand side of each Layer. The same applies to Layer Groups and Layers within Groups. 

Layer Visibility

2. Layer Options in Procreate

Step 1

Tap on a layer to reveal additional options. Let’s start with some of the more straightforward ones:

  • Rename allows you to rename your layer. This is particularly useful for organizational purposes.
  • Select selects the contents of the layer.
  • Copy copies the contents of the layer. You can then paste the contents from the Actions panel. 
  • Fill Layer fills the entire layer with your active color.
  • Clear erases all of the contents of the selected layer.
  • Invert inverts your layer. So, for example, if I had a layer filled with the color black—and then I selected Invert—it would make the contents white.
  • Merge Down merges the layer down with the layer beneath it. The result is one merged layer.
  • Combine Down, on the other hand, merges the active layer and the layer beneath it into a Layer Group. 

Note, the visibility of these options can depend on the number of layers and/or their order. For example, if you only have one layer, you won’t see „Merge Down” or „Combine Down”. If you have Drawing Assist on, this can also be Toggled On or Off from these Layer Options.

Expanded Layer Options

Step 2

Now, let’s take a look at some of the more complicated options.

Alpha Lock locks the Layer’s Transparency

In this example, I have a layer called „Circle” with a purple circle in it. I then Toggled the Alpha Lock On

Now, I can draw within the purple circle area without worrying about going outside of my artwork—this is because the available drawing space has been locked to the area occupied by my original, purple circle. When I try to draw yellow lines, for example, they stay within the confines of the purple circle I’ve already drawn.

Alpha Lock

Step 3

Selecting Mask will attach a Procreate Layer Mask to the active layer. 

In this example, I’ve given the layer „Example” a Fill Color—it’s all green. Note the Layer Mask on top of it in the Layers panel, below.

When looking at the Mask Preview, the black space is hidden and the white space is visible. For example, the white dots in the Mask Preview are the only space where the green will be visible.

Layer Mask

Step 4

Procreate also has Clipping Masks, which we can access from our Layers—a similar but different way to mask your work. 

This time, as an example, create a shape of some kind on a layer of its own. 

Then, create a New Layer on top of this shape. Tap the layer preview and then select Clipping Mask. Now, this layer will act as a Clipping Mask—which means its visibility will be depending on the layer below it. 

In the example below, notice how I could not draw the red lines „outside” of the black circle. That’s because the red lines were drawn on my Clipping Mask—the layer above the black circle layer.

Procreate Clipping Mask

Step 5

Reference makes the active layer a Reference Layer. Procreate Reference Layers are often used to easily keep Line Art and Color Fills separate.

In this example, I’ve created some simple line art on a Layer I’ve called „Line Layer”. I selected Reference to make this into a Reference Layer.

Then, Create a New Layer—I’ve named it „Color Layer”. The layer above the Reference Layer is the one that will rely on said reference. So „Color Layer” is going to reference „Line Layer”.

Procreate Reference Layers make it very easy to add Fills to your Line Art while still keeping your lines independent, on their own layer. With my „Color Layer” selected, all I have to do is drag my active color into the space I’d like filled with color. 

Voila! It recognizes this space defined in my Reference Layer, yet keeps the color separate, on the above layer.

Reference Layer Example

3. Layer Opacity and Blending Modes in Procreate

Step 1

We can also alter the layer’s Blending Modes and the Procreate Layer Opacity. To view these options, click on the N that sits beside the Visibility Toggle.

Open Blending Mode and Opacity Options

Step 2

Right under our layer’s Preview, you’ll notice the Opacity Slider. 100% is full opacity, while 0% would be invisible. Procreate Layer Opacity can also be applied to Groups and Grouped Layers.

Layer Opacity

Step 3

Blending Modes affect how the layer interacts with the other Procreate layers in your composition. By default, the Blending Mode is set to Normal.

Procreate has a whole host of blending modes to try out, including: Multiply, Darken, Color Burn, Linear Burn, Darker Color, Normal, Lighten, Screen, Color Dodge, Add, Lighter Color, Overlay, Soft Light, Hard Light, Vivid Light, Linear Light, Pin Light, Hard Mix, Difference, Exclusion, Subtract, Divide, Hue, Saturation, Color, and Luminosity.

Yeah, that’s a lot! And one of the best ways to get to know blending modes is to jump right in and test them out. View them as different relationships your layers can have with one another—ways that they will literally blend with each other.

Remember, you can always set the Blending Mode back to Normal, to go back to the layer’s default look.

Let’s try a brief example. Below is some line art, on its own layer. Then, on a layer above it, there’s a solid color. Notice the difference between the same layer with different Blending Modes

On the left, the layer with the red color is set to Normal. In the middle, this same red layer is set to Lighten. On the right, this same layer’s Blending Mode is set to Multiply.

Try out the other ones too!

And There You Have It!

We’ve gone through the basics of Procreate layers. There’s plenty to experiment with and expand upon here—one of the best ways to get comfortable with Procreate layers is to jump right in and test them out! Good luck and happy drawing!

Example of Layer Application

Check Out These Premium Procreate Brushes

Looking for some new Procreate brushes to add to your collection? Check out these awesome brushes available now on Envato Elements. They would all make a wonderful addition to any illustrator’s set!

1. Shader Brushes for Procreate

This beautiful collection of 35 brushes is perfect for adding texture to your work. Test out the shaders, add hatching, and experiment with adding some noise to your work.

Shader Brushes for Procreate

2. Art Brushes for Procreate

Love real media? Try out these beautiful real media inspired brushes for Procreate. This collection of 21 brushes has so much to offer. Whether you’re looking for a little texture or a thick, painterly experience, this one is a must download.

Art Brushes for Procreate

3. Oil Paint Brushes for Procreate

Artist guerillacraft has made so many fantastic brushes—and his oil paint brush collection is no exception! 

Oil Paint Brushes for Procreate

4. Flower Touch Procreate Brushes

Isn’t this decorative brush set a treat? The preview is just the tip of the iceberg—there are over 160 different pieces to this set, including both pattern brushes and stamp brushes. Add some fun florals to your illustrative work today.

Flower Touch Procreate Brushes

5. Snow Brushes for Procreate

Whether you’re looking to add organic snowflakes to your work or to experiment with texture, this snow brush set for Procreate has a lot of content to explore. There are 16 brushes to experiment with and enjoy. Give them a try!

Snow Brushes for Procreate

Love Procreate and want to learn more? From creating and customizing brushes to illustration walk-throughs, check out these free Procreate tutorials on Envato Tuts+! Happy drawing!

How to Use Procreate Layers

Post pobrano z: How to Use Procreate Layers

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

Procreate layers are a powerful tool for the digital artist—use them to separate, organize, preserve, and expand your work. There are a myriad of ways to use them, but we’ll start at the beginning with the fundamentals. Use this introduction to help you get started!

Follow along with us over on our Envato Tuts+ YouTube channel:

1. Getting Started With Procreate Layers

Step 1

If you’re unfamiliar, Procreate Layers work much like how they sound—they allow you to layer different pieces of content on top of each other, while maintaining a degree of independence. So, for example, I could draw something on one layer, and then create a new one for additional artwork. The two layers could then be moved and manipulated independently—as opposed to if they were one, dependent work in a shared space.

To reveal your Layers, tap on the Layers Icon in the upper right-hand corner of your work area.

Layers Icon

Step 2

By default, in a New Document, you’ll see two layers: Layer 1 and Background Color. Note that your selected layer is highlighted in blue.

We can create a New Layer by tapping the Plus Sign in our Layers Menu

Create a New Layer

Step 3

Swipe Left to reveal additional actions we can apply to our layers: Lock, Duplicate, and Delete.

Lock locks up the Layer so its contents are protected—you won’t be able to alter the contents until you Unlock them. You can Unlock your layers from this same location.

Duplicate creates a copy of the layer’s contents on a New Layer.

Delete deletes the selected layer. Note, if you only have one layer, you’ll see „Clear” instead of Delete, which will instead delete the layer’s contents.

Lock Duplicate and Delete Layers

Step 4

You can also rearrange your Procreate layers. To Move a Layer, Tap and Hold, and then Drag the Layer to the desired order.

Moving Layers

Step 5

Layers can also be grouped together. In this example, I have three layers. 

Swipe Right on the layers you would like to Group. Notice how the selected layers are highlighted in blue. Then, select the Group Icon in the upper right-hand corner.

Grouping Layers

Step 6

Here is what these layers look like grouped. In this example, the group is expanded, so we can see its contents. Tap on the Downwards Arrow to contract it and hide its contents.

Note that we can rearrange these layers within the group. You can also use this same method to move layers in and out of the group.

Swiping Left will give you the same Lock, Duplicate, and Delete options as you would see in a standard Procreate layer.

Example of Grouped Layers

Step 7

Procreate Layer Visibility can be Toggled On and Off via the check boxes on the right-hand side of each Layer. The same applies to Layer Groups and Layers within Groups. 

Layer Visibility

2. Layer Options in Procreate

Step 1

Tap on a layer to reveal additional options. Let’s start with some of the more straightforward ones:

  • Rename allows you to rename your layer. This is particularly useful for organizational purposes.
  • Select selects the contents of the layer.
  • Copy copies the contents of the layer. You can then paste the contents from the Actions panel. 
  • Fill Layer fills the entire layer with your active color.
  • Clear erases all of the contents of the selected layer.
  • Invert inverts your layer. So, for example, if I had a layer filled with the color black—and then I selected Invert—it would make the contents white.
  • Merge Down merges the layer down with the layer beneath it. The result is one merged layer.
  • Combine Down, on the other hand, merges the active layer and the layer beneath it into a Layer Group. 

Note, the visibility of these options can depend on the number of layers and/or their order. For example, if you only have one layer, you won’t see „Merge Down” or „Combine Down”. If you have Drawing Assist on, this can also be Toggled On or Off from these Layer Options.

Expanded Layer Options

Step 2

Now, let’s take a look at some of the more complicated options.

Alpha Lock locks the Layer’s Transparency

In this example, I have a layer called „Circle” with a purple circle in it. I then Toggled the Alpha Lock On

Now, I can draw within the purple circle area without worrying about going outside of my artwork—this is because the available drawing space has been locked to the area occupied by my original, purple circle. When I try to draw yellow lines, for example, they stay within the confines of the purple circle I’ve already drawn.

Alpha Lock

Step 3

Selecting Mask will attach a Procreate Layer Mask to the active layer. 

In this example, I’ve given the layer „Example” a Fill Color—it’s all green. Note the Layer Mask on top of it in the Layers panel, below.

When looking at the Mask Preview, the black space is hidden and the white space is visible. For example, the white dots in the Mask Preview are the only space where the green will be visible.

Layer Mask

Step 4

Procreate also has Clipping Masks, which we can access from our Layers—a similar but different way to mask your work. 

This time, as an example, create a shape of some kind on a layer of its own. 

Then, create a New Layer on top of this shape. Tap the layer preview and then select Clipping Mask. Now, this layer will act as a Clipping Mask—which means its visibility will be depending on the layer below it. 

In the example below, notice how I could not draw the red lines „outside” of the black circle. That’s because the red lines were drawn on my Clipping Mask—the layer above the black circle layer.

Procreate Clipping Mask

Step 5

Reference makes the active layer a Reference Layer. Procreate Reference Layers are often used to easily keep Line Art and Color Fills separate.

In this example, I’ve created some simple line art on a Layer I’ve called „Line Layer”. I selected Reference to make this into a Reference Layer.

Then, Create a New Layer—I’ve named it „Color Layer”. The layer above the Reference Layer is the one that will rely on said reference. So „Color Layer” is going to reference „Line Layer”.

Procreate Reference Layers make it very easy to add Fills to your Line Art while still keeping your lines independent, on their own layer. With my „Color Layer” selected, all I have to do is drag my active color into the space I’d like filled with color. 

Voila! It recognizes this space defined in my Reference Layer, yet keeps the color separate, on the above layer.

Reference Layer Example

3. Layer Opacity and Blending Modes in Procreate

Step 1

We can also alter the layer’s Blending Modes and the Procreate Layer Opacity. To view these options, click on the N that sits beside the Visibility Toggle.

Open Blending Mode and Opacity Options

Step 2

Right under our layer’s Preview, you’ll notice the Opacity Slider. 100% is full opacity, while 0% would be invisible. Procreate Layer Opacity can also be applied to Groups and Grouped Layers.

Layer Opacity

Step 3

Blending Modes affect how the layer interacts with the other Procreate layers in your composition. By default, the Blending Mode is set to Normal.

Procreate has a whole host of blending modes to try out, including: Multiply, Darken, Color Burn, Linear Burn, Darker Color, Normal, Lighten, Screen, Color Dodge, Add, Lighter Color, Overlay, Soft Light, Hard Light, Vivid Light, Linear Light, Pin Light, Hard Mix, Difference, Exclusion, Subtract, Divide, Hue, Saturation, Color, and Luminosity.

Yeah, that’s a lot! And one of the best ways to get to know blending modes is to jump right in and test them out. View them as different relationships your layers can have with one another—ways that they will literally blend with each other.

Remember, you can always set the Blending Mode back to Normal, to go back to the layer’s default look.

Let’s try a brief example. Below is some line art, on its own layer. Then, on a layer above it, there’s a solid color. Notice the difference between the same layer with different Blending Modes

On the left, the layer with the red color is set to Normal. In the middle, this same red layer is set to Lighten. On the right, this same layer’s Blending Mode is set to Multiply.

Try out the other ones too!

And There You Have It!

We’ve gone through the basics of Procreate layers. There’s plenty to experiment with and expand upon here—one of the best ways to get comfortable with Procreate layers is to jump right in and test them out! Good luck and happy drawing!

Example of Layer Application

Check Out These Premium Procreate Brushes

Looking for some new Procreate brushes to add to your collection? Check out these awesome brushes available now on Envato Elements. They would all make a wonderful addition to any illustrator’s set!

1. Shader Brushes for Procreate

This beautiful collection of 35 brushes is perfect for adding texture to your work. Test out the shaders, add hatching, and experiment with adding some noise to your work.

Shader Brushes for Procreate

2. Art Brushes for Procreate

Love real media? Try out these beautiful real media inspired brushes for Procreate. This collection of 21 brushes has so much to offer. Whether you’re looking for a little texture or a thick, painterly experience, this one is a must download.

Art Brushes for Procreate

3. Oil Paint Brushes for Procreate

Artist guerillacraft has made so many fantastic brushes—and his oil paint brush collection is no exception! 

Oil Paint Brushes for Procreate

4. Flower Touch Procreate Brushes

Isn’t this decorative brush set a treat? The preview is just the tip of the iceberg—there are over 160 different pieces to this set, including both pattern brushes and stamp brushes. Add some fun florals to your illustrative work today.

Flower Touch Procreate Brushes

5. Snow Brushes for Procreate

Whether you’re looking to add organic snowflakes to your work or to experiment with texture, this snow brush set for Procreate has a lot of content to explore. There are 16 brushes to experiment with and enjoy. Give them a try!

Snow Brushes for Procreate

Love Procreate and want to learn more? From creating and customizing brushes to illustration walk-throughs, check out these free Procreate tutorials on Envato Tuts+! Happy drawing!

Black people targeted / Tellement identique que ça troue le C**?

Post pobrano z: Black people targeted / Tellement identique que ça troue le C**?

THE ORIGINAL?
G.E.R – Racism awareness – 2018
“Racism hides in the smallest of details
The homicide rate in brazil is 71.4% higher
among black people”  
Agency : Sides (Brazil)
LESS ORIGINAL
Coalizão Negra P-D Racism Awareness – 2020
“75,5% of the people murdered in Brazil
are black”
Source : Adsoftheworld
Agency : Wunderman Thompson (Brazil)

Black people targeted / Tellement identique que ça troue le C**?

Post pobrano z: Black people targeted / Tellement identique que ça troue le C**?

THE ORIGINAL?
G.E.R – Racism awareness – 2018
“Racism hides in the smallest of details
The homicide rate in brazil is 71.4% higher
among black people”  
Agency : Sides (Brazil)
LESS ORIGINAL
Coalizão Negra P-D Racism Awareness – 2020
“75,5% of the people murdered in Brazil
are black”
Source : Adsoftheworld
Agency : Wunderman Thompson (Brazil)

Carrefour Lowest Price: Don’t let the bill

Post pobrano z: Carrefour Lowest Price: Don’t let the bill
Outdoor, Print
Carrefour

Carrefour Campaign – DON’T LET THE BILL The campaign’s concept is that a shopping bill shouldn’t scare, confuse, or agitate customers. The execution uses receipt bills formed into different shapes to represent each of these feelings. Body copy reassures the viewer that the hypermarket offers low prices so that one doesn’t have to worry about expenses.

Advertising Agency:Wunderman, Amman, Jordan
Creative Director:Fahid Ibrahim
CS Director:Ibrahim Tadros
Account Handler:Saad Habaibeh
English Copywriter:Fahid Ibrahim

How to secure a website and be foolproof against surprises

Post pobrano z: How to secure a website and be foolproof against surprises

The internet is an excellent resource for all
kinds of information. However, with all of its advantages, there are also some
things that you need to pay attention too. Knowing how to secure a website is a
must, and anyone with an online identity needs to pay attention to this.

As the internet can also be a dangerous place
for websites knowing how to protect them is an investment in the long run. As
an owner, knowing that somebody can wipe out your entire page feels quite bad.

What is needed is to add protection that keeps
out hackers, bugs, or any harmful things. If this doesn’t happen, the entire
data can be at risk, the site can crash, and you could lose money.

Why should you know how to secure a website?

Even if you have a small website that you
consider not relevant for a hacker, websites are still compromised all the
time.

Most of the problems that appear are not
related to data or to mess up the layout of a website. The main reason is to
use your server as an email relay for spam or to add files of an illegal
nature. Other things hackers do is to compromise machines, a well-known one
being to mine for Bitcoins using your hardware.

How can you secure your site?

One of the best ways to do this is by going
for simple choices. You know that you should keep the website safe from
surprises, but when you go down in the rabbit hole of a website, You can
discover difficult concepts.

No worries, there are still some basic steps
that you can take together with decisions so let’s see them.

Password and protection

First of all, start by having more complex
passwords than in general. Avoid using the same old one for your accounts and
especially your website’s administrator login. Never use easy to remember
passwords because they can be even guessed sometimes by hackers.

Do not use words that relate to your family or
your name. Passwords that contain your birthday are so easy to hack that you
can’t even complain that you did not expect that to happen.

Also, when you access your website, use a
secure complex password that you can’t guess. A single user’s weak password can
make your entire website be at risk, together with all of its registered users.

Keep everything up-to-date

This can seem quite obvious, but sometimes
people just don’t do it. Make sure that all of the software that you are using
related to your website is on its latest version.

A lot of them are open-source, so this means
that hackers can check the source code and find vulnerabilities. This is how
they usually manage to get inside of your website and take advantage of it. So,
whenever you think it’s
a good idea to downgrade WordPress
, don’t. New versions usually fix
vulnerabilities.

Choose a reputable hosting provider

Today, there are many hosting providers that
you can choose from. Even if most of them are safe and have many protections,
they can still get hacked. This is probably one of the current disadvantages;
you can’t control how secure your hosting server is. The only thing you can
control is who you choose as your host provider.

It’s probably in your interest to go for
reputable, world-class hosting providers that invest big amounts in providing
the best services.

Go for HTTPS and SSL

If you don’t know what HTTP and SSL are, you
need to find out, especially if you are a site owner. People that are running
online shops and have transactions made need to pay even more attention to
their protection.

SSL certificates are obtained from reputable
providers and offer great protection. Understanding how to secure a website
should always include an SSL certificate.

Install security plugins

If you built your website with a content
management system (CMS), you could add security plugins that prevent your
website from getting hacked. Each of the main CMS options has security plugins
available, and a lot of them are free.

Security plugins for WordPress:

Security options for Magento:

Security extensions for Joomla:

These options are focused on the security
vulnerabilities that each of the platforms has.

Prevent users from uploading files

What this means is that people don’t get forms
through which they can upload files. Limiting forms of how users can upload
files to just photo extensions can be a solution. Sure, they’ll receive more of
those „this
file is not permitted
” errors. But you’ll be safer.

Another one is to add an email address to your
contact page where users can email their files rather than sending them
directly through the website.

Beware of error messages

Be careful about how much information you are
giving in the error messages that your website has. Only give minimal errors to
the users. Sometimes errors can send sensitive information like API keys or
database passwords.

If you don’t change them, you risk getting
certain attacks on your website. This information is good to know, and if you
could do a check to it for sure, it is going to be only in your interest.

Watch out when opening emails

Many attacks from hackers take place by using
emails. They send all kinds of viruses, and they can target you or your
employees, for example.

So the entire team needs
to double-check when they open an email
because you don’t want to
compromise the security of your website due to a virus that is ready to mess up
your online presence.

Secure data using VPN

Even if there are many options for safeguards,
the best one to secure your data transmission is using VPN. It is a great
service that is designed to make sure that all of your data gets routed only
through secure channels and that they are highly encrypted.

Create backups regularly

If you don’t do it, now is the time to start.
A backup can help you recover fully if any of your website content gets
damaged. There are lots
of options out there
to try.

What is cool now is that you can set the
frequency of how often they are getting done. So for sure, this is another
useful tip on how to secure a website, especially if this is the first time
that you are doing it.

Conclusion

In conclusion, understanding how to secure a
website is all about having good practices. Simple solutions are, most of the
time, the efficient ones. This is why the ones that you can see in this article
are easy to use. So the best way to start your own check is by seeing if you
are applying all of them.

Make a list of what your website is doing now
from a protection point of view. It’s better to invest some time and energy now
when you can and not after you’ve been targeted by hackers.

How to secure a website and be foolproof against surprises

Post pobrano z: How to secure a website and be foolproof against surprises

The internet is an excellent resource for all
kinds of information. However, with all of its advantages, there are also some
things that you need to pay attention too. Knowing how to secure a website is a
must, and anyone with an online identity needs to pay attention to this.

As the internet can also be a dangerous place
for websites knowing how to protect them is an investment in the long run. As
an owner, knowing that somebody can wipe out your entire page feels quite bad.

What is needed is to add protection that keeps
out hackers, bugs, or any harmful things. If this doesn’t happen, the entire
data can be at risk, the site can crash, and you could lose money.

Why should you know how to secure a website?

Even if you have a small website that you
consider not relevant for a hacker, websites are still compromised all the
time.

Most of the problems that appear are not
related to data or to mess up the layout of a website. The main reason is to
use your server as an email relay for spam or to add files of an illegal
nature. Other things hackers do is to compromise machines, a well-known one
being to mine for Bitcoins using your hardware.

How can you secure your site?

One of the best ways to do this is by going
for simple choices. You know that you should keep the website safe from
surprises, but when you go down in the rabbit hole of a website, You can
discover difficult concepts.

No worries, there are still some basic steps
that you can take together with decisions so let’s see them.

Password and protection

First of all, start by having more complex
passwords than in general. Avoid using the same old one for your accounts and
especially your website’s administrator login. Never use easy to remember
passwords because they can be even guessed sometimes by hackers.

Do not use words that relate to your family or
your name. Passwords that contain your birthday are so easy to hack that you
can’t even complain that you did not expect that to happen.

Also, when you access your website, use a
secure complex password that you can’t guess. A single user’s weak password can
make your entire website be at risk, together with all of its registered users.

Keep everything up-to-date

This can seem quite obvious, but sometimes
people just don’t do it. Make sure that all of the software that you are using
related to your website is on its latest version.

A lot of them are open-source, so this means
that hackers can check the source code and find vulnerabilities. This is how
they usually manage to get inside of your website and take advantage of it. So,
whenever you think it’s
a good idea to downgrade WordPress
, don’t. New versions usually fix
vulnerabilities.

Choose a reputable hosting provider

Today, there are many hosting providers that
you can choose from. Even if most of them are safe and have many protections,
they can still get hacked. This is probably one of the current disadvantages;
you can’t control how secure your hosting server is. The only thing you can
control is who you choose as your host provider.

It’s probably in your interest to go for
reputable, world-class hosting providers that invest big amounts in providing
the best services.

Go for HTTPS and SSL

If you don’t know what HTTP and SSL are, you
need to find out, especially if you are a site owner. People that are running
online shops and have transactions made need to pay even more attention to
their protection.

SSL certificates are obtained from reputable
providers and offer great protection. Understanding how to secure a website
should always include an SSL certificate.

Install security plugins

If you built your website with a content
management system (CMS), you could add security plugins that prevent your
website from getting hacked. Each of the main CMS options has security plugins
available, and a lot of them are free.

Security plugins for WordPress:

Security options for Magento:

Security extensions for Joomla:

These options are focused on the security
vulnerabilities that each of the platforms has.

Prevent users from uploading files

What this means is that people don’t get forms
through which they can upload files. Limiting forms of how users can upload
files to just photo extensions can be a solution. Sure, they’ll receive more of
those „this
file is not permitted
” errors. But you’ll be safer.

Another one is to add an email address to your
contact page where users can email their files rather than sending them
directly through the website.

Beware of error messages

Be careful about how much information you are
giving in the error messages that your website has. Only give minimal errors to
the users. Sometimes errors can send sensitive information like API keys or
database passwords.

If you don’t change them, you risk getting
certain attacks on your website. This information is good to know, and if you
could do a check to it for sure, it is going to be only in your interest.

Watch out when opening emails

Many attacks from hackers take place by using
emails. They send all kinds of viruses, and they can target you or your
employees, for example.

So the entire team needs
to double-check when they open an email
because you don’t want to
compromise the security of your website due to a virus that is ready to mess up
your online presence.

Secure data using VPN

Even if there are many options for safeguards,
the best one to secure your data transmission is using VPN. It is a great
service that is designed to make sure that all of your data gets routed only
through secure channels and that they are highly encrypted.

Create backups regularly

If you don’t do it, now is the time to start.
A backup can help you recover fully if any of your website content gets
damaged. There are lots
of options out there
to try.

What is cool now is that you can set the
frequency of how often they are getting done. So for sure, this is another
useful tip on how to secure a website, especially if this is the first time
that you are doing it.

Conclusion

In conclusion, understanding how to secure a
website is all about having good practices. Simple solutions are, most of the
time, the efficient ones. This is why the ones that you can see in this article
are easy to use. So the best way to start your own check is by seeing if you
are applying all of them.

Make a list of what your website is doing now
from a protection point of view. It’s better to invest some time and energy now
when you can and not after you’ve been targeted by hackers.

Some Typography Links

Post pobrano z: Some Typography Links

I just can’t stop bookmarking great links related to typography. I’m afraid I’m going to have to subject you, yet again, to a bunch of them all grouped up. So those of you that care about web type stuff, enjoy.


I know there are lots of good reasons to be excited about variable fonts. The design possibilities of endless variations in one file is chief among them. But I remain the most excited about the performance benefits. Having a single file that elegantly handles the thicker weights (for bolding) and italics is so cool. I can’t wait to wave my fist saying back in my day we had to load multiple files for our font variations!

Mandy Michael digs into the performance implications in a deeper way than just reducing the number of requests.

Even if you consider the slightly larger file sizes, when combined with improved font compression formats like WOFF2, font subsetting and font loading techniques like font-display: swap; we end up in a situation where we can still get smaller overall font file sizes as well as a significant increase in stylistic opportunity.


Anna Monus did some variable font performance testing as well, evaluating the extreme case of loading 12 variations of a font against a variable font. Even though the copy of the variable font she had for Roboto was massive (over 1MB), there was a perf gain compared against loading 12 variations.


Roboto is on Google Fonts, of course, and it’s got the #1 position by far. But Google Fonts has Inter now, and I’d expect that leap up in the charts as it’s got a style that everyone seems to like and can work with just about anything.


Seeing a variable font control a smiley face is never not gonna make me happy. Don’t miss that first face-ness slider, lollllz.


Klint Finley on the proliferation of high-quality open-source fonts for WIRED. Sometimes they are backed by companies with thick wallets, which makes sense. But the motivation for doing it varies. Sometimes quality is the goal. Like open-source anything, lots of contributions, can, if handled well, lead to a better product. But open-source doesn’t always mean there isn’t a business possibility, and if not, not everyone cares about turning a profit on everything.


Speaking of open-source fonts, Collletttivo is an open-source font foundry with a good dozen typefaces, including a variable font one. It’s a super fun site to explore with the little fake windows you open up and move around.


There’s a new mac app called FontGoggles for poking into a font file and taking a look at what it offers. Seems like that would be easy but it really isn’t. I like that it supports WOFF/2 as that’s pretty much all we deal with on the web.

Also, remember there is a website that looks around in font files with the best name ever.


Font Match allows you to put fonts on top of each other for comparisons. Seems like it’s more for large type and comparing their features, while Font style matcher is more about comparing paragraph text.

In fact, using Font style matcher to make a perfect font fallback is one of my all-time favorite CSS-Tricks. Sssshh… don’t tell anybody but I’m compiling those all-time favorites into a book, like this chapter. You’d have to subscribe to read it, because that’s kind of the point: I’d like to sell the book. So if you happen to subscribe now, there is stuff to read there, but you’d be a very early supporter for the rest of it.

The post Some Typography Links appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

Getting JavaScript to Talk to CSS and Sass

Post pobrano z: Getting JavaScript to Talk to CSS and Sass

JavaScript and CSS have lived beside one another for upwards of 20 years. And yet it’s been remarkably tough to share data between them. There have been large attempts, sure. But, I have something simple and intuitive in mind — something not involving a structural change, but rather putting CSS custom properties and even Sass variables to use.

CSS custom properties and JavaScript

Custom properties shouldn’t be all that surprising here. One thing they’ve always been able to do since browsers started supporting them is work alongside JavaScript to set and manipulate the values.

Specifically, though, we can use JavaScript with custom properties in a few ways. We can set the value of a custom property using setProperty:

document.documentElement.style.setProperty("--padding", 124 + "px"); // 124px

We can also retrieve CSS variables using getComputedStyle in JavaScript. The logic behind this is fairly simple: custom properties are part of the style, therefore, they are part of computed style.

getComputedStyle(document.documentElement).getPropertyValue('--padding') // 124px

Same sort of deal with getPropertyValue. That let us get the custom property value from an inlined style from HTML markup.

document.documentElement.style.getPropertyValue("--padding'"); // 124px

Note that custom properties are scoped. This means we need to get computed styles from a particular element. As we previously defined our variable in :root we get them on the HTML element.

Sass variables and JavaScript

Sass is a pre-processing language, meaning it’s turned into CSS before it ever is a part of a website. For that reason, accessing them from JavaScript in the same way as CSS custom properties — which are accessible in the DOM as computed styles — is not possible. 

We need to modify our build process to change this. I doubt there isn’t a huge need for this in most cases since loaders are often already part of a build process. But if that’s not the case in your project, we need three modules that are capable of importing and translating Sass modules.

Here’s how that looks in a webpack configuration:

module.exports = {
 // ...
 module: {
  rules: [
   {
    test: /\.scss$/,
    use: ["style-loader", "css-loader", "sass-loader"]
   },
   // ...
  ]
 }
};

To make Sass (or, specifically, SCSS in this case) variables available to JavaScript, we need to “export” them.

// variables.scss
$primary-color: #fe4e5e;
$background-color: #fefefe;
$padding: 124px;

:export {
  primaryColor: $primary-color;
  backgroundColor: $background-color;
  padding: $padding;
}

The :export block is the magic sauce webpack uses to import the variables. What is nice about this approach is that we can rename the variables using camelCase syntax and choose what we expose.

Then we import the Sass file (variables.scss) file into JavaScript, giving us access to the variables defined in the file.

import variables from './variables.scss';

/*
 {
  primaryColor: "#fe4e5e"
  backgroundColor: "#fefefe"
  padding: "124px"
 }
*/

document.getElementById("app").style.padding = variables.padding;

There are some restrictions on the :export syntax that are worth calling out:

  • It must be at the top level but can be anywhere in the file.
  • If there is more than one in a file, the keys and values are combined and exported together.
  • If a particular exportedKey is duplicated, the last one (in the source order) takes precedence.
  • An exportedValue may contain any character that’s valid in CSS declaration values (including spaces).
  • An exportedValue does not need to be quoted because it is already treated as a literal string.

There are lots of ways having access to Sass variables in JavaScript can come in handy. I tend to reach for this approach for sharing breakpoints. Here is my breakpoints.scs file, which I later import in JavaScript so I can use the matchMedia() method to have consistent breakpoints.

// Sass variables that define breakpoint values
$breakpoints: (
  mobile: 375px,
  tablet: 768px,
  // etc.
);

// Sass variables for writing out media queries
$media: (
  mobile: '(max-width: #{map-get($breakpoints, mobile)})',
  tablet: '(max-width: #{map-get($breakpoints, tablet)})',
  // etc.
);

// The export module that makes Sass variables accessible in JavaScript
:export {
  breakpointMobile: unquote(map-get($media, mobile));
  breakpointTablet: unquote(map-get($media, tablet));
  // etc.
}

Animations are another use case. The duration of an animation is usually stored in CSS, but more complex animations need to be done with JavaScript’s help.

// animation.scss
$global-animation-duration: 300ms;
$global-animation-easing: ease-in-out;

:export {
  animationDuration: strip-unit($global-animation-duration);
  animationEasing: $global-animation-easing;
}

Notice that I use a custom strip-unit function when exporting the variable. This allows me to easily parse things on the JavaScript side.

// main.js
document.getElementById('image').animate([
  { transform: 'scale(1)', opacity: 1, offset: 0 },
  { transform: 'scale(.6)', opacity: .6, offset: 1 }
], {
  duration: Number(variables.animationDuration),
  easing: variables.animationEasing,
});

It makes me happy that I can exchange data between CSS, Sass and JavaScript so easily. Sharing variables like this makes code simple and DRY.

There are multiple ways to achieve the same sort of thing, of course. Les James shared an interesting approach in 2017 that allows Sass and JavaScript to interact via JSON. I may be biased, but I find the approach we covered here to be the simplest and most intuitive. It doesn’t require crazy changes to the way you already use and write CSS and JavaScript.

Are there other approaches that you might be using somewhere? Share them here in the comments — I’d love to see how you’re solving it.

The post Getting JavaScript to Talk to CSS and Sass appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

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