How to Create an Isometric Layered Text Effect in Adobe Illustrator

Post pobrano z: How to Create an Isometric Layered Text Effect in Adobe Illustrator

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

In the following steps you will learn how to create an isometric layered text effect in Adobe Illustrator.

For starters, you will learn how to create a simple piece of text and how to adjust its attributes. Taking full advantage of the Appearance panel, you will learn how to add multiple layers to the text. Using a simple 3D Rotate text effect, you will learn how to add an isometric look to the text.

Finally, you will learn how to add a simple background and a subtle texture to the final design.

For more inspiration on how to adjust or improve your final text effect, you can find plenty of resources at GraphicRiver.

What You’ll Need

You’ll need the following resource in order to complete this project:

1. How to Create the First Piece of Text

Step 1

Hit Control-N to create a new document. Select Pixels from the Units drop-down menu, enter 850 in the width box and 540 in the height box, and then click that More Settings button. Select RGB for the Color Mode, set the Raster Effects to Screen (72 ppi), and then click Create Document.

Open the Info panel (Window > Info) for a live preview with the size and position of your selections. Don’t forget to set the unit of measurement to pixels from Edit > Preferences > Units. All these options will significantly increase your work speed.

new document

Step 2

Pick the Type Tool (T) and open the Character panel (Window > Type > Character). Select the Auro font and set the size to 200 px.

Click on the artboard and add your „Red” piece of text about as shown below. Make it black, for now.

type tool

Step 3

Select your text, focus on the Swatches panel (Window > Swatches), and click that [None] swatch to remove the black text color.

Move to the Appearance panel (Window > Appearance) and add a new fill using the Add New Fill button. Select that new fill and set the color to R=242 G=242 B=248.

add new fill

Step 4

Make sure that your text stays selected, focus on the Appearance panel, and add a second fill using that same Add New Fill button.

Select this new fill, set the color to R=58 G=95 B=245, and go to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Drag the Move-Horizontal slider to 0.8 px and the Move-Vertical slider to -0.8 px, enter 5 in the Copies box, and then click OK.

transform effect

Step 5

Make sure that your text stays selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel. Add a third fill and move it in the bottom of the panel. Set its color to R=242 G=242 B=248 and go to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Drag the Move-Horizontal slider to 0.8 px and the Move-Vertical slider to -0.8 px, enter 10 in the Copies box, and then click OK.

Return to the Appearance panel, select the blue fill, and duplicate it using the Duplicate Selected Item button. Drag this new fill to the bottom of the Appearance panel and open the Transform effect applied to it. Enter 15 in the Copies box and click OK.

duplidcate selected item

Step 6

Make sure that your text stays selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel.

Continue to duplicate the bottom fills, varying the two colors, and with every new fill increase the value in the Copies box by 5. Stop at the 20th fill. In the end, things should look like in the following image.

multiply fill

2. How to Create the Second Piece of Text

Step 1

Duplicate your piece of text. Select the copy and simply replace the „Red” with „Blue”.

duplicate text

Step 2

Select your „Blue” piece of text and focus on the Appearance panel. Select all the blue fills and simply replace that color with R=235 G=47 B=38.

red fills

Step 3

Make sure that your „Blue” piece of text is still selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel. One by one, open the Transform effects applied to the 19 fills and drag the Move-Horizontal sliders to -0.8 px.

transform effect

3. How to Apply the 3D Isometric Effect

Step 1

Select your „Blue” piece of text and focus on the Appearance panel. Make sure that the entire piece of text is selected (simply click the „Type” piece of text from the top of the panel) and go to Effect > 3D > Rotate. Enter the attributes shown below and click OK.

3D Rotate

Step 2

Select your „Red” text and focus on the Appearance panel. Make sure that the entire piece of text is selected and go to Effect > 3D > Rotate. Enter the attributes shown below and click OK.

isometric

Step 3

Bring your „Red” piece of text to front (Shift-Control-]) and place it as shown below.

place text

4. How to Create the Text Shadow

Step 1

Pick the Type Tool (T) and add a second „Red” piece of text. Use the same font attributes and set its color to R=58 G=95 B=245.

blue text

Step 2

Make sure that your blue piece of text stays selected and go to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Enter the attributes shown below, click OK, and go to Effect > 3D > Rotate. Enter the settings shown below and click OK.

isometric text

Step 3

Pick the Type Tool (T) and add a second „Blue” piece of text. Use the same font attributes and set its color to R=235 G=47 B=38.

red text

Step 4

Make sure that your red piece of text stays selected and go to Effect > 3D > Rotate. Enter the attributes shown below, click OK, and go to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Enter the settings shown below and click OK.

isometric text

5. How to Create the Background

Step 1

Pick the Rectangle Tool (M) and create an 870 x 560 px shape. Fill this new shape with R=242 G=242 B=248, send it to back (Shift-Control-[), and make sure that it covers your entire artboard.

background

Step 2

Select your rectangle, add a copy in front (Control-C > Control-F), and bring it to front (Shift-Control-]).

Make sure that this new shape stays selected and focus on the Appearance panel. First, replace the flat color with the radial gradient shown below. Use the Gradient Tool (G) to stretch your gradient about as shown below. Lower its Opacity to 5% and change the Blending Mode to Multiply, and then go to Effect > Artistic > Film Grain. Enter the attributes shown below and click OK.

radial gradient

Congratulations! You’re Done!

Here is how it should look. I hope you’ve enjoyed this tutorial and can apply these techniques in your future projects. Don’t hesitate to share your final result in the comments section.

Feel free to adjust the final design and make it your own. You can find some great sources of inspiration at GraphicRiver, with interesting solutions to improve your design.

final product

How to Create an Isometric Layered Text Effect in Adobe Illustrator

Post pobrano z: How to Create an Isometric Layered Text Effect in Adobe Illustrator

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

In the following steps you will learn how to create an isometric layered text effect in Adobe Illustrator.

For starters, you will learn how to create a simple piece of text and how to adjust its attributes. Taking full advantage of the Appearance panel, you will learn how to add multiple layers to the text. Using a simple 3D Rotate text effect, you will learn how to add an isometric look to the text.

Finally, you will learn how to add a simple background and a subtle texture to the final design.

For more inspiration on how to adjust or improve your final text effect, you can find plenty of resources at GraphicRiver.

What You’ll Need

You’ll need the following resource in order to complete this project:

1. How to Create the First Piece of Text

Step 1

Hit Control-N to create a new document. Select Pixels from the Units drop-down menu, enter 850 in the width box and 540 in the height box, and then click that More Settings button. Select RGB for the Color Mode, set the Raster Effects to Screen (72 ppi), and then click Create Document.

Open the Info panel (Window > Info) for a live preview with the size and position of your selections. Don’t forget to set the unit of measurement to pixels from Edit > Preferences > Units. All these options will significantly increase your work speed.

new document

Step 2

Pick the Type Tool (T) and open the Character panel (Window > Type > Character). Select the Auro font and set the size to 200 px.

Click on the artboard and add your „Red” piece of text about as shown below. Make it black, for now.

type tool

Step 3

Select your text, focus on the Swatches panel (Window > Swatches), and click that [None] swatch to remove the black text color.

Move to the Appearance panel (Window > Appearance) and add a new fill using the Add New Fill button. Select that new fill and set the color to R=242 G=242 B=248.

add new fill

Step 4

Make sure that your text stays selected, focus on the Appearance panel, and add a second fill using that same Add New Fill button.

Select this new fill, set the color to R=58 G=95 B=245, and go to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Drag the Move-Horizontal slider to 0.8 px and the Move-Vertical slider to -0.8 px, enter 5 in the Copies box, and then click OK.

transform effect

Step 5

Make sure that your text stays selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel. Add a third fill and move it in the bottom of the panel. Set its color to R=242 G=242 B=248 and go to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Drag the Move-Horizontal slider to 0.8 px and the Move-Vertical slider to -0.8 px, enter 10 in the Copies box, and then click OK.

Return to the Appearance panel, select the blue fill, and duplicate it using the Duplicate Selected Item button. Drag this new fill to the bottom of the Appearance panel and open the Transform effect applied to it. Enter 15 in the Copies box and click OK.

duplidcate selected item

Step 6

Make sure that your text stays selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel.

Continue to duplicate the bottom fills, varying the two colors, and with every new fill increase the value in the Copies box by 5. Stop at the 20th fill. In the end, things should look like in the following image.

multiply fill

2. How to Create the Second Piece of Text

Step 1

Duplicate your piece of text. Select the copy and simply replace the „Red” with „Blue”.

duplicate text

Step 2

Select your „Blue” piece of text and focus on the Appearance panel. Select all the blue fills and simply replace that color with R=235 G=47 B=38.

red fills

Step 3

Make sure that your „Blue” piece of text is still selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel. One by one, open the Transform effects applied to the 19 fills and drag the Move-Horizontal sliders to -0.8 px.

transform effect

3. How to Apply the 3D Isometric Effect

Step 1

Select your „Blue” piece of text and focus on the Appearance panel. Make sure that the entire piece of text is selected (simply click the „Type” piece of text from the top of the panel) and go to Effect > 3D > Rotate. Enter the attributes shown below and click OK.

3D Rotate

Step 2

Select your „Red” text and focus on the Appearance panel. Make sure that the entire piece of text is selected and go to Effect > 3D > Rotate. Enter the attributes shown below and click OK.

isometric

Step 3

Bring your „Red” piece of text to front (Shift-Control-]) and place it as shown below.

place text

4. How to Create the Text Shadow

Step 1

Pick the Type Tool (T) and add a second „Red” piece of text. Use the same font attributes and set its color to R=58 G=95 B=245.

blue text

Step 2

Make sure that your blue piece of text stays selected and go to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Enter the attributes shown below, click OK, and go to Effect > 3D > Rotate. Enter the settings shown below and click OK.

isometric text

Step 3

Pick the Type Tool (T) and add a second „Blue” piece of text. Use the same font attributes and set its color to R=235 G=47 B=38.

red text

Step 4

Make sure that your red piece of text stays selected and go to Effect > 3D > Rotate. Enter the attributes shown below, click OK, and go to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Enter the settings shown below and click OK.

isometric text

5. How to Create the Background

Step 1

Pick the Rectangle Tool (M) and create an 870 x 560 px shape. Fill this new shape with R=242 G=242 B=248, send it to back (Shift-Control-[), and make sure that it covers your entire artboard.

background

Step 2

Select your rectangle, add a copy in front (Control-C > Control-F), and bring it to front (Shift-Control-]).

Make sure that this new shape stays selected and focus on the Appearance panel. First, replace the flat color with the radial gradient shown below. Use the Gradient Tool (G) to stretch your gradient about as shown below. Lower its Opacity to 5% and change the Blending Mode to Multiply, and then go to Effect > Artistic > Film Grain. Enter the attributes shown below and click OK.

radial gradient

Congratulations! You’re Done!

Here is how it should look. I hope you’ve enjoyed this tutorial and can apply these techniques in your future projects. Don’t hesitate to share your final result in the comments section.

Feel free to adjust the final design and make it your own. You can find some great sources of inspiration at GraphicRiver, with interesting solutions to improve your design.

final product

How to Create an Isometric Layered Text Effect in Adobe Illustrator

Post pobrano z: How to Create an Isometric Layered Text Effect in Adobe Illustrator

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

In the following steps you will learn how to create an isometric layered text effect in Adobe Illustrator.

For starters, you will learn how to create a simple piece of text and how to adjust its attributes. Taking full advantage of the Appearance panel, you will learn how to add multiple layers to the text. Using a simple 3D Rotate text effect, you will learn how to add an isometric look to the text.

Finally, you will learn how to add a simple background and a subtle texture to the final design.

For more inspiration on how to adjust or improve your final text effect, you can find plenty of resources at GraphicRiver.

What You’ll Need

You’ll need the following resource in order to complete this project:

1. How to Create the First Piece of Text

Step 1

Hit Control-N to create a new document. Select Pixels from the Units drop-down menu, enter 850 in the width box and 540 in the height box, and then click that More Settings button. Select RGB for the Color Mode, set the Raster Effects to Screen (72 ppi), and then click Create Document.

Open the Info panel (Window > Info) for a live preview with the size and position of your selections. Don’t forget to set the unit of measurement to pixels from Edit > Preferences > Units. All these options will significantly increase your work speed.

new document

Step 2

Pick the Type Tool (T) and open the Character panel (Window > Type > Character). Select the Auro font and set the size to 200 px.

Click on the artboard and add your „Red” piece of text about as shown below. Make it black, for now.

type tool

Step 3

Select your text, focus on the Swatches panel (Window > Swatches), and click that [None] swatch to remove the black text color.

Move to the Appearance panel (Window > Appearance) and add a new fill using the Add New Fill button. Select that new fill and set the color to R=242 G=242 B=248.

add new fill

Step 4

Make sure that your text stays selected, focus on the Appearance panel, and add a second fill using that same Add New Fill button.

Select this new fill, set the color to R=58 G=95 B=245, and go to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Drag the Move-Horizontal slider to 0.8 px and the Move-Vertical slider to -0.8 px, enter 5 in the Copies box, and then click OK.

transform effect

Step 5

Make sure that your text stays selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel. Add a third fill and move it in the bottom of the panel. Set its color to R=242 G=242 B=248 and go to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Drag the Move-Horizontal slider to 0.8 px and the Move-Vertical slider to -0.8 px, enter 10 in the Copies box, and then click OK.

Return to the Appearance panel, select the blue fill, and duplicate it using the Duplicate Selected Item button. Drag this new fill to the bottom of the Appearance panel and open the Transform effect applied to it. Enter 15 in the Copies box and click OK.

duplidcate selected item

Step 6

Make sure that your text stays selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel.

Continue to duplicate the bottom fills, varying the two colors, and with every new fill increase the value in the Copies box by 5. Stop at the 20th fill. In the end, things should look like in the following image.

multiply fill

2. How to Create the Second Piece of Text

Step 1

Duplicate your piece of text. Select the copy and simply replace the „Red” with „Blue”.

duplicate text

Step 2

Select your „Blue” piece of text and focus on the Appearance panel. Select all the blue fills and simply replace that color with R=235 G=47 B=38.

red fills

Step 3

Make sure that your „Blue” piece of text is still selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel. One by one, open the Transform effects applied to the 19 fills and drag the Move-Horizontal sliders to -0.8 px.

transform effect

3. How to Apply the 3D Isometric Effect

Step 1

Select your „Blue” piece of text and focus on the Appearance panel. Make sure that the entire piece of text is selected (simply click the „Type” piece of text from the top of the panel) and go to Effect > 3D > Rotate. Enter the attributes shown below and click OK.

3D Rotate

Step 2

Select your „Red” text and focus on the Appearance panel. Make sure that the entire piece of text is selected and go to Effect > 3D > Rotate. Enter the attributes shown below and click OK.

isometric

Step 3

Bring your „Red” piece of text to front (Shift-Control-]) and place it as shown below.

place text

4. How to Create the Text Shadow

Step 1

Pick the Type Tool (T) and add a second „Red” piece of text. Use the same font attributes and set its color to R=58 G=95 B=245.

blue text

Step 2

Make sure that your blue piece of text stays selected and go to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Enter the attributes shown below, click OK, and go to Effect > 3D > Rotate. Enter the settings shown below and click OK.

isometric text

Step 3

Pick the Type Tool (T) and add a second „Blue” piece of text. Use the same font attributes and set its color to R=235 G=47 B=38.

red text

Step 4

Make sure that your red piece of text stays selected and go to Effect > 3D > Rotate. Enter the attributes shown below, click OK, and go to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Enter the settings shown below and click OK.

isometric text

5. How to Create the Background

Step 1

Pick the Rectangle Tool (M) and create an 870 x 560 px shape. Fill this new shape with R=242 G=242 B=248, send it to back (Shift-Control-[), and make sure that it covers your entire artboard.

background

Step 2

Select your rectangle, add a copy in front (Control-C > Control-F), and bring it to front (Shift-Control-]).

Make sure that this new shape stays selected and focus on the Appearance panel. First, replace the flat color with the radial gradient shown below. Use the Gradient Tool (G) to stretch your gradient about as shown below. Lower its Opacity to 5% and change the Blending Mode to Multiply, and then go to Effect > Artistic > Film Grain. Enter the attributes shown below and click OK.

radial gradient

Congratulations! You’re Done!

Here is how it should look. I hope you’ve enjoyed this tutorial and can apply these techniques in your future projects. Don’t hesitate to share your final result in the comments section.

Feel free to adjust the final design and make it your own. You can find some great sources of inspiration at GraphicRiver, with interesting solutions to improve your design.

final product

How to Create an Isometric Layered Text Effect in Adobe Illustrator

Post pobrano z: How to Create an Isometric Layered Text Effect in Adobe Illustrator

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

In the following steps you will learn how to create an isometric layered text effect in Adobe Illustrator.

For starters, you will learn how to create a simple piece of text and how to adjust its attributes. Taking full advantage of the Appearance panel, you will learn how to add multiple layers to the text. Using a simple 3D Rotate text effect, you will learn how to add an isometric look to the text.

Finally, you will learn how to add a simple background and a subtle texture to the final design.

For more inspiration on how to adjust or improve your final text effect, you can find plenty of resources at GraphicRiver.

What You’ll Need

You’ll need the following resource in order to complete this project:

1. How to Create the First Piece of Text

Step 1

Hit Control-N to create a new document. Select Pixels from the Units drop-down menu, enter 850 in the width box and 540 in the height box, and then click that More Settings button. Select RGB for the Color Mode, set the Raster Effects to Screen (72 ppi), and then click Create Document.

Open the Info panel (Window > Info) for a live preview with the size and position of your selections. Don’t forget to set the unit of measurement to pixels from Edit > Preferences > Units. All these options will significantly increase your work speed.

new document

Step 2

Pick the Type Tool (T) and open the Character panel (Window > Type > Character). Select the Auro font and set the size to 200 px.

Click on the artboard and add your „Red” piece of text about as shown below. Make it black, for now.

type tool

Step 3

Select your text, focus on the Swatches panel (Window > Swatches), and click that [None] swatch to remove the black text color.

Move to the Appearance panel (Window > Appearance) and add a new fill using the Add New Fill button. Select that new fill and set the color to R=242 G=242 B=248.

add new fill

Step 4

Make sure that your text stays selected, focus on the Appearance panel, and add a second fill using that same Add New Fill button.

Select this new fill, set the color to R=58 G=95 B=245, and go to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Drag the Move-Horizontal slider to 0.8 px and the Move-Vertical slider to -0.8 px, enter 5 in the Copies box, and then click OK.

transform effect

Step 5

Make sure that your text stays selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel. Add a third fill and move it in the bottom of the panel. Set its color to R=242 G=242 B=248 and go to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Drag the Move-Horizontal slider to 0.8 px and the Move-Vertical slider to -0.8 px, enter 10 in the Copies box, and then click OK.

Return to the Appearance panel, select the blue fill, and duplicate it using the Duplicate Selected Item button. Drag this new fill to the bottom of the Appearance panel and open the Transform effect applied to it. Enter 15 in the Copies box and click OK.

duplidcate selected item

Step 6

Make sure that your text stays selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel.

Continue to duplicate the bottom fills, varying the two colors, and with every new fill increase the value in the Copies box by 5. Stop at the 20th fill. In the end, things should look like in the following image.

multiply fill

2. How to Create the Second Piece of Text

Step 1

Duplicate your piece of text. Select the copy and simply replace the „Red” with „Blue”.

duplicate text

Step 2

Select your „Blue” piece of text and focus on the Appearance panel. Select all the blue fills and simply replace that color with R=235 G=47 B=38.

red fills

Step 3

Make sure that your „Blue” piece of text is still selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel. One by one, open the Transform effects applied to the 19 fills and drag the Move-Horizontal sliders to -0.8 px.

transform effect

3. How to Apply the 3D Isometric Effect

Step 1

Select your „Blue” piece of text and focus on the Appearance panel. Make sure that the entire piece of text is selected (simply click the „Type” piece of text from the top of the panel) and go to Effect > 3D > Rotate. Enter the attributes shown below and click OK.

3D Rotate

Step 2

Select your „Red” text and focus on the Appearance panel. Make sure that the entire piece of text is selected and go to Effect > 3D > Rotate. Enter the attributes shown below and click OK.

isometric

Step 3

Bring your „Red” piece of text to front (Shift-Control-]) and place it as shown below.

place text

4. How to Create the Text Shadow

Step 1

Pick the Type Tool (T) and add a second „Red” piece of text. Use the same font attributes and set its color to R=58 G=95 B=245.

blue text

Step 2

Make sure that your blue piece of text stays selected and go to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Enter the attributes shown below, click OK, and go to Effect > 3D > Rotate. Enter the settings shown below and click OK.

isometric text

Step 3

Pick the Type Tool (T) and add a second „Blue” piece of text. Use the same font attributes and set its color to R=235 G=47 B=38.

red text

Step 4

Make sure that your red piece of text stays selected and go to Effect > 3D > Rotate. Enter the attributes shown below, click OK, and go to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Enter the settings shown below and click OK.

isometric text

5. How to Create the Background

Step 1

Pick the Rectangle Tool (M) and create an 870 x 560 px shape. Fill this new shape with R=242 G=242 B=248, send it to back (Shift-Control-[), and make sure that it covers your entire artboard.

background

Step 2

Select your rectangle, add a copy in front (Control-C > Control-F), and bring it to front (Shift-Control-]).

Make sure that this new shape stays selected and focus on the Appearance panel. First, replace the flat color with the radial gradient shown below. Use the Gradient Tool (G) to stretch your gradient about as shown below. Lower its Opacity to 5% and change the Blending Mode to Multiply, and then go to Effect > Artistic > Film Grain. Enter the attributes shown below and click OK.

radial gradient

Congratulations! You’re Done!

Here is how it should look. I hope you’ve enjoyed this tutorial and can apply these techniques in your future projects. Don’t hesitate to share your final result in the comments section.

Feel free to adjust the final design and make it your own. You can find some great sources of inspiration at GraphicRiver, with interesting solutions to improve your design.

final product

How to Create an Isometric Layered Text Effect in Adobe Illustrator

Post pobrano z: How to Create an Isometric Layered Text Effect in Adobe Illustrator

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

In the following steps you will learn how to create an isometric layered text effect in Adobe Illustrator.

For starters, you will learn how to create a simple piece of text and how to adjust its attributes. Taking full advantage of the Appearance panel, you will learn how to add multiple layers to the text. Using a simple 3D Rotate text effect, you will learn how to add an isometric look to the text.

Finally, you will learn how to add a simple background and a subtle texture to the final design.

For more inspiration on how to adjust or improve your final text effect, you can find plenty of resources at GraphicRiver.

What You’ll Need

You’ll need the following resource in order to complete this project:

1. How to Create the First Piece of Text

Step 1

Hit Control-N to create a new document. Select Pixels from the Units drop-down menu, enter 850 in the width box and 540 in the height box, and then click that More Settings button. Select RGB for the Color Mode, set the Raster Effects to Screen (72 ppi), and then click Create Document.

Open the Info panel (Window > Info) for a live preview with the size and position of your selections. Don’t forget to set the unit of measurement to pixels from Edit > Preferences > Units. All these options will significantly increase your work speed.

new document

Step 2

Pick the Type Tool (T) and open the Character panel (Window > Type > Character). Select the Auro font and set the size to 200 px.

Click on the artboard and add your „Red” piece of text about as shown below. Make it black, for now.

type tool

Step 3

Select your text, focus on the Swatches panel (Window > Swatches), and click that [None] swatch to remove the black text color.

Move to the Appearance panel (Window > Appearance) and add a new fill using the Add New Fill button. Select that new fill and set the color to R=242 G=242 B=248.

add new fill

Step 4

Make sure that your text stays selected, focus on the Appearance panel, and add a second fill using that same Add New Fill button.

Select this new fill, set the color to R=58 G=95 B=245, and go to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Drag the Move-Horizontal slider to 0.8 px and the Move-Vertical slider to -0.8 px, enter 5 in the Copies box, and then click OK.

transform effect

Step 5

Make sure that your text stays selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel. Add a third fill and move it in the bottom of the panel. Set its color to R=242 G=242 B=248 and go to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Drag the Move-Horizontal slider to 0.8 px and the Move-Vertical slider to -0.8 px, enter 10 in the Copies box, and then click OK.

Return to the Appearance panel, select the blue fill, and duplicate it using the Duplicate Selected Item button. Drag this new fill to the bottom of the Appearance panel and open the Transform effect applied to it. Enter 15 in the Copies box and click OK.

duplidcate selected item

Step 6

Make sure that your text stays selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel.

Continue to duplicate the bottom fills, varying the two colors, and with every new fill increase the value in the Copies box by 5. Stop at the 20th fill. In the end, things should look like in the following image.

multiply fill

2. How to Create the Second Piece of Text

Step 1

Duplicate your piece of text. Select the copy and simply replace the „Red” with „Blue”.

duplicate text

Step 2

Select your „Blue” piece of text and focus on the Appearance panel. Select all the blue fills and simply replace that color with R=235 G=47 B=38.

red fills

Step 3

Make sure that your „Blue” piece of text is still selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel. One by one, open the Transform effects applied to the 19 fills and drag the Move-Horizontal sliders to -0.8 px.

transform effect

3. How to Apply the 3D Isometric Effect

Step 1

Select your „Blue” piece of text and focus on the Appearance panel. Make sure that the entire piece of text is selected (simply click the „Type” piece of text from the top of the panel) and go to Effect > 3D > Rotate. Enter the attributes shown below and click OK.

3D Rotate

Step 2

Select your „Red” text and focus on the Appearance panel. Make sure that the entire piece of text is selected and go to Effect > 3D > Rotate. Enter the attributes shown below and click OK.

isometric

Step 3

Bring your „Red” piece of text to front (Shift-Control-]) and place it as shown below.

place text

4. How to Create the Text Shadow

Step 1

Pick the Type Tool (T) and add a second „Red” piece of text. Use the same font attributes and set its color to R=58 G=95 B=245.

blue text

Step 2

Make sure that your blue piece of text stays selected and go to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Enter the attributes shown below, click OK, and go to Effect > 3D > Rotate. Enter the settings shown below and click OK.

isometric text

Step 3

Pick the Type Tool (T) and add a second „Blue” piece of text. Use the same font attributes and set its color to R=235 G=47 B=38.

red text

Step 4

Make sure that your red piece of text stays selected and go to Effect > 3D > Rotate. Enter the attributes shown below, click OK, and go to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Enter the settings shown below and click OK.

isometric text

5. How to Create the Background

Step 1

Pick the Rectangle Tool (M) and create an 870 x 560 px shape. Fill this new shape with R=242 G=242 B=248, send it to back (Shift-Control-[), and make sure that it covers your entire artboard.

background

Step 2

Select your rectangle, add a copy in front (Control-C > Control-F), and bring it to front (Shift-Control-]).

Make sure that this new shape stays selected and focus on the Appearance panel. First, replace the flat color with the radial gradient shown below. Use the Gradient Tool (G) to stretch your gradient about as shown below. Lower its Opacity to 5% and change the Blending Mode to Multiply, and then go to Effect > Artistic > Film Grain. Enter the attributes shown below and click OK.

radial gradient

Congratulations! You’re Done!

Here is how it should look. I hope you’ve enjoyed this tutorial and can apply these techniques in your future projects. Don’t hesitate to share your final result in the comments section.

Feel free to adjust the final design and make it your own. You can find some great sources of inspiration at GraphicRiver, with interesting solutions to improve your design.

final product

JAMstack_conf

Post pobrano z: JAMstack_conf

I love a good conference that exists because there is a rising tide in technology. JAMstack_conf:

Static site generators, serverless architectures, and powerful APIs are giving front-end teams fullstack capabilities — without the pain of owning infrastructure. It’s a new approach called the JAMstack.

I’ll be speaking at it! I’ve been pretty interested in all this and trying to learn and document as much as I can.

Save $100 with csstricks100.

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Props and PropTypes in React

Post pobrano z: Props and PropTypes in React

React encourages developers to build by breaking a UI up into components. This means there will always be a need to pass data from one component to another — more specifically, from parent to child component — since we’re stitching them together and they rely on one another.

React calls the data passed between components props and we’re going to look into those in great detail. And, since we’re talking about props, any post on the topic would be incomplete without looking at PropTypes because they ensure that components are passing the right data needed for the job.

With that, let’s unpack these essential but loaded terms together.

Props: The data being passed around

Basically, props are what make React the tool that it is. React was designed to break things down into pieces that are served when they are needed. Props are defining characteristics stored by those pieces and they are accessed and sent when they’re requested. The result is a screen that renders only what it needs and nothing more, speeding up page loads and boosting overall performance.

These data can come in different forms: namely, strings, array and functions. The ability to pass data between components, so let’s break down specifically how to access and pass data.

Passing and accessing props

Let’s say we are working on an application that shows a list of interesting demos pulled from CodePen:

See the Pen Props Pen by Kingsley Silas Chijioke (@kinsomicrote) on CodePen.

We can illustrate the app as a collection of components:

The list of pens is going to require data, notably the title, URL and author for each demo that the app displays. We can construct that data like so:

const pensList = [
  {
    title: "Elastic Input[Google Chrome]",
    url: "https://codepen.io/andreasstorm/pen/JBGWBa",
    author: "Andreas Storm"
  },
  {
    title: "Phenomenon instances!",
    url: "https://codepen.io/cvaneenige/pen/ajNjaN",
    author: "Colin van Eenige"
  },
  {
    title: "cpc-forms experiment with css variables",
    url: "https://codepen.io/terabaud/pen/YjwYKv",
    author: "Lea Rosema"
  },
  {
    title: "Nuotron Logo Animation with Hover Effect",
    url: "https://codepen.io/YahiaRefaiea/pen/YjyZLm",
    author: "Yahia Refaiea"
  }
];

The App component will pull the data. Here’s the basic structure for that component:

const App = () => {
  return (
    <div>
      <PenList pens={pensList} />
    </div>
  );
}

We are passing an array of pens as a prop to the PenList (which we’ll create in just a bit). The parent component (PenList) accesses the data (penList), which gets passed as pens props to the child component (Pen).

const PenList = props => {
  return (
    <React.Fragment>
      <h2>Interesting Pens on CodePen</h2>
      <ul>
        {props.pens.map(pen => {
          return (
            <li key={pen.url}>
              <Pen {...pen} />
            </li>
          );
        })}
      </ul>
    </React.Fragment>
  );
};

The PenList component loops through the pens props (props.pens) to return each item as a Pen component. If this was a class component, we would prefix the pens props with this, like this:

class PenList extends React.Component {
  render() {
    return (
      <React.Fragment>
        <h2>Interesting Pens on CodePen</h2>
        <ul>
          {
            this.props.pens.map(pen => {
              return (
                <li key={pen.url}>
                  <Pen {...pen} />
                </li>
              )
            })
          }
        </ul>
      </React.Fragment>
    )
  }
}

The next thing to note is the use of key in the example. A key is a unique identifier we can assign to each item in our list to make sure we can distinguish between items. In this case, we’re mapping the key to the URL of each pen. There’s no chance of two items being the same, so it’s a good piece of data to use for this purpose.

The remaining properties are passed as props to the Pen component. Here’s the Pen component making use of those props:

const Pen = props => {
  return (
    <div>
      <p>
        [{props.title}]
      </p>
      <p>Made by: {props.author}</p>
    </div>
  );
};

Note that we are constructing the Pen component (const Pen) rather than defining it as a class (class PenList) like we did for the PenList component. As such, we can access the values using props. That’s a handy little shorthand we can use instead of re-mapping Pen to the data. The parent already has it, so let’s just pass it along!

Passing functions using props

We just looked at passing an array of data as props from one component to another, but what if we’re working with functions instead? React allows us to pass functions between components, but it’s quite technical. Still, it’s something you’d want to do for specific use cases and worth us looking into.

Let’s use a simple example, say an app that allows you to create a list of tasks. You know, a to-do list, like for chores, projects or what have you. In this app, the list of tasks is contained in the App component, which is the parent component. The Todo component will be the child in this scenario, and its sole job will be to list each task that gets created.

In true to-do list form, we don’t just want to create tasks, but be able to remove them once a task has been created. Since the to-do list is contained in the App component, we have to be able to identify the specific item the user wants to remove from the list by obtaining the id and then remove the item in the App component.

Sound complex? Here’s what we’re going for:

See the Pen Props Pen 2 by Kingsley Silas Chijioke (@kinsomicrote) on CodePen.

Broken down into code:

let todoCounter = 1;

class App extends React.Component {
  state = {
    list: [],
    item: ""
  };

  handleInputChange = event => {
    this.setState({ item: event.target.value });
  };

  handleSubmit = event => {
    event.preventDefault();
    const item = {
      id: todoCounter++,
      value: this.state.item.slice()
    };
    this.setState({
      list: this.state.list.concat(item),
      item: ""
    });
  };

  handleRemove = id => {
    this.setState({
      list: this.state.list.filter(c => c.id !== id)
    });
  };

  render() {
    return (
      <React.Fragment>
        <h2>Add Todo</h2>
        <div>
          <input
            type="text"
            value={this.state.item}
            onChange={this.handleInputChange}
          />
        </div>
        <div>
          <button type="submit" onClick={this.handleSubmit}>
            Add
          </button>
        </div>
        <div>
          <h3>Lists</h3>
          <ul>
            {this.state.list.map(item => {
              return (
                <li key={item.id}>
                  <Todo {...item} removeTodo={this.handleRemove} />
                </li>
              );
            })}
          </ul>
        </div>
      </React.Fragment>
    );
  }
}

Notice that we defined todoCounter at the top and set it to 1. We created this so we can have unique keys for the to-do items just like we did when we used URLs for the list of pens in our previous example.

The method for deleting tasks is created in the App component. In the render() function, we pass the to-do properties as props to the Todo component. We also pass the handleRemove() function as a prop named removeTodo(). We will use this in the Todo component which looks like this.

class Todo extends React.Component {
  deleteTodo = id => {
    this.props.removeTodo(id);
  };
  render() {
    return (
      <div>
        {this.props.value}
        <button onClick={() => this.deleteTodo(this.props.id)}>X</button>
      </div>
    );
  }
}

We have to pass the id of the to-do item to removeTodo() in the Todo component because we cannot update the state of the App component without it. This is essentially how we are able to pass a function between components using props — pretty similar to how we did it with an array, the difference being we’re passing functionality around instead of raw data.

PropTypes

PropTypes ensure that the right type of props is passed to a component — and, conversely, that the receiving component is receiving the right type of props.

We can think about them like a football quarterback passing the ball to a receiver. The quarterback only wants his players to receive the ball. And, for that matter, the quarterback wants the receiver to catch a ball — not a cat, pickle or taxi. PropTypes would ensure that the correct object (a ball) is being passed and that it is passed to the correct receiver (player on the team).

(If only football had PropTypes in real life!)

To make use of PropTypes, you have to add the package as a dependency to your application by running yarn add prop-types in the command line.

We can use PropTypes in our app that displays interesting pens. Here is how we will use it for the Pen component:

Pen.propTypes = {
  title: PropTypes.string,
  url: PropTypes.string,
  author: PropTypes.string
};

We’re declaring that the props for title, url and author should be strings. Not numbers. Not functions. Strings and strings alone.

If we happened to the props of author to a number instead of a string like this:

author: PropTypes.number

…we will get an error:

Warning: Failed prop type: Invalid prop `author` of type `string` supplied to `Pen`, expected `number`.

So, PropTypes are useful in catching bugs. We can also enforce passing props by using isRequired:

Pen.propTypes = {
  title: PropTypes.string.isRequired,
  url: PropTypes.string.isRequired,
  author: PropTypes.string.isRequired
};

The basic data types you will need include string, number, boolean, function, etc.

Person.propTypes = {
  email: PropTypes.string,
  age: PropTypes.number,
  availability: PropTypes.bool,
  handleSubmit: PropTypes.func
}

There are more types available and tons of documentation on them.

In cases where a prop is optional (i.e. not using isRequired), you can set a default value to make sure something gets passed:

Developer.defaultProps = {
  language: 'JavaScript' 
}

With this, the language prop will always have a value when it used — even if one isn’t provided.

Wrap Up

Well, that’s a broad look at props in React. It’s pretty much a guarantee that you will use both props and propTypes in a React application. Hopefully this post shows just how important they are to React as a whole because, without them, we have nothing to pass between components when interactions happen. They’re very much a core part of the component-driven and state management architecture that React is designed around.

And propTypes are an added bonus — like a built-in quality assurance checker for catching bugs and letting us know about them. Nice to know that they’ve got our back as we work.

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