Innovation Can’t Keep the Web Fast

Post pobrano z: Innovation Can’t Keep the Web Fast

Every so often, the fruits of innovation bear fruit in the form of improvements to the foundational layers of the web. In 2015, HTTP/2 became a published standard in an effort to update an aging protocol. This was was both necessary and overdue, as HTTP/1 rendered web performance as an arcane sort of discipline in the form of strange workarounds of its limitations. Though HTTP/2 proliferation isn’t absolute — and there are kinks yet to be worked out — I don’t think it’s a stretch to say the web is better off because of it.

Unfortunately, the rollout of HTTP/2 has presided over a 102% median increase of bytes transferred over mobile the last four years. If we look at the 90th percentile of that same dataset — because it’s really the long tail of performance we need to optimize for — we see an increase of 239%. From 2016 (PDF warning) to 2019, the average mobile download speed in the U.S. has increased by 73%. In Brazil and India, average mobile download speeds increased by 75% and 28%, respectively, in that same period of time.

While page weight alone doesn’t necessarily tell the whole story of the user experience, it is, at the very least, a loosely related phenomenon which threatens the collective user experience. The story that HTTPArchive tells through data acquired from the Chrome User Experience Export (CrUX) can be interpreted a number of different ways, but this one fact is steadfast and unrelenting: most metrics gleaned from CrUX over the last couple of years show little, if any improvement despite various improvements in browsers, the HTTP protocol, and the network itself.

Given these trends, all that can be said of the impact of these improvements at this point is that it has helped to stem the tide of our excesses, but precious little to reduce them. Despite every significant improvement to the underpinnings of the web and the networks we access it through, we continue to build for it in ways that suggest we’re content with the never-ending Jevons paradox in which we toil.

If we’re to make progress in making a faster web for everyone, we must recognize some of the impediments to that goal:

  1. The relentless desire to monetize every square inch of the web, as well as the army of third party vendors which fuel the research mandated by such fevered efforts.
  2. Workplace cultures that favor unrestrained feature-driven development. This practice adds to — but rarely takes away from — what we cram down the wire to users.
  3. Developer conveniences that make the job of the developer easier, but can place an increasing cost on the client.

Counter-intuitively, owners of mature codebases which embody some or all of these traits continue to take the same unsustainable path to profitability they always have. They do this at their own peril, rather than acknowledge the repeatedly established fact that performance-first development practices will do as much — or more — for their bottom line and the user experience.

It’s with this understanding that I’ve come to accept that our current approach to remedy poor performance largely consists of engineering techniques that stem from the ill effects of our business, product management, and engineering practices. We’re good at applying tourniquets, but not so good at sewing up deep wounds.

It’s becoming increasingly clear that web performance isn’t solely an engineering problem, but a problem of people. This is an unappealing assessment in part because technical solutions are comparably inarguable. Content compression works. Minification works. Tree shaking works. Code splitting works. They’re undeniably effective solutions to what may seem like entirely technical problems.

The intersection of web performance and people, on the other hand, is messy and inconvenient. Unlike a technical solution as clearly beneficial as HTTP/2, how do we qualify what successful performance cultures look like? How do we qualify successful approaches to get there? I don’t know exactly what that looks like, but I believe a good template is the following marriage of cultural and engineering tenets:

  1. An organization can’t be successful in prioritizing performance if it can’t secure the support of its leaders. Without that crucial element, it becomes extremely difficult for organizations to create a culture in which performance is the primary feature of their product.
  2. Even with leadership support, performance can’t be effectively prioritized if the telemetry isn’t in place to measure it. Without measurement, it becomes impossible to explain how product development affects performance. If you don’t have the numbers, no one will care about performance until it becomes an apparent crisis.
  3. When you have the support of leadership to make performance a priority and the telemetry in place to measure it, you still can’t get there unless your entire organization understands web performance. This is the time at which you develop and roll out training, documentation, best practices, and standards the organization can embrace. In some ways, this is the space which organizations have already spent a lot of time in, but the challenging work is in establishing feedback loops to assess how well they understand and have applied that knowledge.
  4. When all of the other pieces are finally in place, you can start to create accountability in the organization around performance. Accountability doesn’t come in the form of reprisals when your telemetry tells you performance has suffered over time, but rather in the form of guard rails put in place in the deployment process to alert you when thresholds have been crossed.

Now comes the kicker: even if all of these things come together in your workplace, good outcomes aren’t guaranteed. Barring some regulation that forces us to address the poorly performing websites in our charge — akin to how the ADA keeps us on our toes with regard to accessibility — it’s going to take continuing evangelism and pressure to ensure performance remains a priority. Like so much of the work we do on the web, the work of maintaining a good user experience in evolving codebases is never done. I hope 2020 is the year that we meaningfully recognize that performance is about people, and adapt accordingly.

As technological innovations such as HTTP/3 and 5G emerge, we must take care not to rest on our laurels and simply assume they will heal our ills once and for all. If we do, we’ll certainly be having this discussion again when the successors to those technologies loom. Innovation alone can’t keep the web fast because making the web fast — and keeping it that way — is the hard work we can only accomplish by working together.

The post Innovation Can’t Keep the Web Fast appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

Smaller HTML Payloads with Service Workers

Post pobrano z: Smaller HTML Payloads with Service Workers

Short story: Philip Walton has a clever idea for using service workers to cache the top and bottom of HTML files, reducing a lot of network weight.

Longer thoughts: When you’re building a really simple website, you can get away with literally writing raw HTML. It doesn’t take long to need a bit more abstraction than that. Even if you’re building a three-page site, that’s three HTML files, and your programmer’s mind will be looking for ways to not repeat yourself. You’ll probably find a way to „include” all the stuff at the top and bottom of the HTML, and just change the content in the middle.

I have tended to reach for PHP for that sort of thing in the past (<?php include('header.php); ?>), although these days I’m feeling much more Jamstack-y and I’d probably do it with Eleventy and Nunjucks.

Or, you could go down the SPA (Single Page App) route just for this basic abstraction if you want. Next and Nuxt are perhaps a little heavy-handed for a few includes, but hey, at least they are easy to work with and the result is a nice static site. The thing about these JavaScript-powered SPA frameworks (Gatsby is in here, too), is that they „hydrate” from static sites into SPAs as the JavaScript loads. Part of the reason for that is speed. No longer does the browser need to reload and request a whole big HTML page again to render; it just asks for whatever smaller amount of data it needs and replaces it on the fly.

So in a sense, you might build a SPA because you have a common header and footer and just want to replace the guts, for efficiencies sake.

Here’s Phil:

In a traditional client-server setup, the server always needs to send a full HTML page to the client for every request (otherwise the response would be invalid). But when you think about it, that’s pretty wasteful. Most sites on the internet have a lot of repetition in their HTML payloads because their pages share a lot of common elements (e.g. the <head>, navigation bars, banners, sidebars, footers etc.). But in an ideal world, you wouldn’t have to send so much of the same HTML, over and over again, with every single page request.

With service workers, there’s a solution to this problem. A service worker can request just the bare minimum of data it needs from the server (e.g. an HTML content partial, a Markdown file, JSON data, etc.), and then it can programmatically transform that data into a full HTML document.

So rather than PHP, Eleventy, a JavaScript framework, or any other solution, Phil’s idea is that a service worker (a native browser technology) can save a cache of a site’s header and footer. Then server requests only need to be made for the „guts” while the full HTML document can be created on the fly.

It’s a super fancy idea, and no joke to implement, but the fact that it could be done with less tooling might be appealing to some. On Phil’s site:

 on this site over the past 30 days, page loads from a service worker had a 47.6% smaller network payloads, and a median First Contentful Paint (FCP) that was 52.3% faster than page loads without a service worker (416ms vs. 851ms).

Aside from configuring a service worker, I’d think the most finicky part is having to configure your server/API to deliver a content-only version of your stuff or build two flat file versions of everything.

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15 Fonts Similar to Helvetica

Post pobrano z: 15 Fonts Similar to Helvetica

Looking for fonts similar to Helvetica? Here you’ll find 15 cutting-edge alternatives to the designer’s favorite sans serif, the Helvetica typeface. 

exensa sans
Exensa Grotesk font family

From styles which lift inspiration from the Helvetica typeface to the closest fonts to Helvetica Neue, you’ll be sure to find a Helvetica alternative here that might convince you to switch loyalties from the original. 

A typeface with a longstanding reputation, Helvetica has had a huge influence on contemporary culture, inspiring a Helvetica shirt and even a Helvetica documentary. 

Looking for more sans serif fonts? Check out the wide range of modern and minimal fonts available for download on Envato Elements and GraphicRiver.

Fonts Similar to Helvetica: The Top 15

Below you’ll find 15 fonts similar to Helvetica, Helvetica Neue, and Arial. Dive in and discover these great alternatives inspired by International Style. 

1. VISIA Pro

A more rounded take on a geometric sans serif style, VISIA Pro balances friendly openness with professional minimalism. 

Ultra-legible and clear, this typeface would make a great Helvetica alternative for posters and signage. Download it from Envato Elements

visia pro
visia pro
VISIA Pro font family

2. Noirden Sans

Complete with six weights and an oblique option, Noirden Sans is a hard-working take on the authentic Helvetica style. Retaining the no-nonsense Swiss style of the Helvetica typeface, Noirden Sans is slightly more rounded, giving it a more contemporary feel.  

If you’re looking for a Helvetica alternative that is barely distinguishable from the original at first glance, Noirden Sans is a great pick. 

noirden sans
noirden pro
Noirden Sans font family

3. Bw Nista International

Designed by Alberto Ramanos, Bw Nista is a large family of three related typefaces—Grotesk, International, and Geometric. Bw Nista International takes its inspiration from the grid-based Swiss style of typographic design, making it more serious and retro in style than its Grotesk and Geometric relations. 

This clean and rational typeface is available in seven weights, from Thin to Black, with matching oblique italics, providing an exceptionally hard-working font for your projects.

bw nista
bw nista
Bw Nista font family

4. Exensa Grotesk

Described as an ‘authentic sans serif’ by its designers, foundry Fontastica, Exensa Grotesk is inspired by elegant, clean Swiss type design. 

With an almost compressed look to the lettering, Exensa is chunky and highly legible, making it a good all-round choice for both headlines and body text. 

exensa
exensa
Exensa Grotesk font family

5. Noveltica Nova Pro

A very elegant tribute to Swiss typography, Noveltica Nova Pro is a geometric sans in the tradition of Helvetica and Verdana. The uniformity of the height and width of the letterforms gives the typeface a neutral voice, making it the ideal partner for almost any kind of design project.

Pair the Light and Bold weights together to create high-impact headlines with an authentic Helvetica style. 

noveltica nova
noveltica nova
Noveltica Nova Pro font family

6. Lorin

More geometric in style than some of the fonts already discussed, Lorin is an ultra-contemporary sans serif with a clean and rounded style. 

Designed by foundry Fontastica, Lorin has a softer and more fashionable style than some of the more true-to-Helvetica typefaces, and as a result it makes the perfect alternative for projects which require a little more charm and personality, such as retail branding and packaging design. 

lorin
lorin
Lorin font family

7. AS Grammatika

With a distinctly vintage-industrial edge, AS Grammatika pairs the neo-grotesque style of Helvetica with the condensed, Germanic style of D-Din

This is a no-frills, clinical take on the Helvetica tradition, with a sturdy and practical feel. Available in five weights, AS Grammatika is less rounded than some of the other fonts on this list, giving it a more digitised look. Perfect for signage or instructional content, this font would also be a good choice for corporate media. 

as grammatika
as grammatika
AS Grammatika font family

8. Neue Fofi

Designed by Arrtde, Neue Fofi is a geometric sans serif with a mid-century modern style. The rounded letters are slightly extended, giving the typeface a bouncy optimism. 

If you’re looking for a Helvetica alternative which has a more contemporary, open style, this typeface would be the perfect choice. Use it on branding projects or on websites to give them a friendly yet legible type style.  

neue fofi
neue fofi
Neue Fofi font family

9. Herz

Slightly condensed and with generous tracking, Herz is a grounded and simple take on the Helvetica style. 

Quirky curves on the letterforms give the typeface a distinctly contemporary edge, while it still retains a practicality and neutrality that would make it a good fit for a wide range of projects. 

herz
Herz font family

10. CA Saygon Text

Described as a ‘calmer’ version of its CA Saygon sibling, CA Saygon Text has been designed with easier reading in mind. Inspired by early grotesque typefaces such as Akzidenz Grotesk, the typeface nonetheless has a highly contemporary look, thanks in part to its high x-height. Letters like ‘f’ and ‘t’, which in other fonts might tend to end in curves, have been given right angles, giving a nod to current trends in typeface design.

CA Saygon Text is available in five unusual stylistic weights—Futura Style, Helvetica Style, Franklin Style, Cape Style, and Flat Style—giving it an incredibly diverse range of internal styles. 

saygon text
saygon text
CA Saygon Text font family

11. Hamlin

Hamlin is an ultra-minimal sans serif inspired by classic geometric typefaces. 

With rounded letterforms and unusual ‘kick-out’ angles on some of the uppercase letters, such as the ‘M’, Hamlin has an extremely clean and stylish look which would make it a beautiful choice for branding or logo design. 

hamlin
hamlin
Hamlin font family

12. Grotte

Available in three weights and able to support a wide range of languages, including Spanish, Portuguese, German, Danish, French, and Cyrillic, Grotte is a great Helvetica alternative for designers seeking a more adaptable multi-lingual font. 

With a slightly naive, rounded style, Grotte is also a more youthful take on the Swiss style of type design. 

grotte
grotte
Grotte font family

13. SOLO

Created by Unique Foundry, SOLO is a fresh and breezy take on the Helvetica style. The typeface is very beautiful and easy to read, with a little quirk added through soft stylistic curves added to some of the letterforms, such as the lowercase ‘a’. 

Download the desktop and web fonts, including OTF, TTF, EOT, SVG, and WOFF versions, from Envato Elements.

solo
solo
SOLO font family

14. Config

Config is a large geometric sans serif family consisting of 40 fonts in 10 weights, plus italic styles. The proportions of the typeface have been condensed by incorporating rigid sides on each letterform, creating a font that is sturdy and space-efficient. 

With a digitised, robotic look to the font, this typeface would be especially suited to app and website design, or for tech publications. 

Config also includes an Alt family with extended notch characters, making it ideal for adding visual interest to headlines and logos.

config
config
Config font family

15. Oxford

Described by its designer jenwagnerco as an ‘essential sans serif’, Oxford has a subtly hand-created quality which sets it apart from many of the other Helvetica alternatives on our list. 

While Oxford is quite a departure from the true Helvetica style, it retains the legibility, minimalism, and understated beauty of the Swiss style of type design. 

oxford
oxford
Oxford font family

Want to Learn More About Helvetica?

If you’re interested in learning more about Helvetica, why not check out our article on Everything You Wanted to Know About Helvetica or this great video by Envato’s YouTube channel:

Still Hunting for the Perfect Helvetica Font Alternative?

From the true-to-Helvetica styling of Noirden Sans to the ultra-minimal mood of Hamlin, and a range of other Helvetica alternatives in-between, we hope you’ve found a font similar to Helvetica in the list above that captures your imagination. 

If not, you can discover even more sans serif fonts on Envato Elements and GraphicRiver. Discover our essential edits of the best fonts to add to your collection below:

15 Fonts Similar to Helvetica

Post pobrano z: 15 Fonts Similar to Helvetica

Looking for fonts similar to Helvetica? Here you’ll find 15 cutting-edge alternatives to the designer’s favorite sans serif, the Helvetica typeface. 

exensa sans
Exensa Grotesk font family

From styles which lift inspiration from the Helvetica typeface to the closest fonts to Helvetica Neue, you’ll be sure to find a Helvetica alternative here that might convince you to switch loyalties from the original. 

A typeface with a longstanding reputation, Helvetica has had a huge influence on contemporary culture, inspiring a Helvetica shirt and even a Helvetica documentary. 

Looking for more sans serif fonts? Check out the wide range of modern and minimal fonts available for download on Envato Elements and GraphicRiver.

Fonts Similar to Helvetica: The Top 15

Below you’ll find 15 fonts similar to Helvetica, Helvetica Neue, and Arial. Dive in and discover these great alternatives inspired by International Style. 

1. VISIA Pro

A more rounded take on a geometric sans serif style, VISIA Pro balances friendly openness with professional minimalism. 

Ultra-legible and clear, this typeface would make a great Helvetica alternative for posters and signage. Download it from Envato Elements

visia pro
visia pro
VISIA Pro font family

2. Noirden Sans

Complete with six weights and an oblique option, Noirden Sans is a hard-working take on the authentic Helvetica style. Retaining the no-nonsense Swiss style of the Helvetica typeface, Noirden Sans is slightly more rounded, giving it a more contemporary feel.  

If you’re looking for a Helvetica alternative that is barely distinguishable from the original at first glance, Noirden Sans is a great pick. 

noirden sans
noirden pro
Noirden Sans font family

3. Bw Nista International

Designed by Alberto Ramanos, Bw Nista is a large family of three related typefaces—Grotesk, International, and Geometric. Bw Nista International takes its inspiration from the grid-based Swiss style of typographic design, making it more serious and retro in style than its Grotesk and Geometric relations. 

This clean and rational typeface is available in seven weights, from Thin to Black, with matching oblique italics, providing an exceptionally hard-working font for your projects.

bw nista
bw nista
Bw Nista font family

4. Exensa Grotesk

Described as an ‘authentic sans serif’ by its designers, foundry Fontastica, Exensa Grotesk is inspired by elegant, clean Swiss type design. 

With an almost compressed look to the lettering, Exensa is chunky and highly legible, making it a good all-round choice for both headlines and body text. 

exensa
exensa
Exensa Grotesk font family

5. Noveltica Nova Pro

A very elegant tribute to Swiss typography, Noveltica Nova Pro is a geometric sans in the tradition of Helvetica and Verdana. The uniformity of the height and width of the letterforms gives the typeface a neutral voice, making it the ideal partner for almost any kind of design project.

Pair the Light and Bold weights together to create high-impact headlines with an authentic Helvetica style. 

noveltica nova
noveltica nova
Noveltica Nova Pro font family

6. Lorin

More geometric in style than some of the fonts already discussed, Lorin is an ultra-contemporary sans serif with a clean and rounded style. 

Designed by foundry Fontastica, Lorin has a softer and more fashionable style than some of the more true-to-Helvetica typefaces, and as a result it makes the perfect alternative for projects which require a little more charm and personality, such as retail branding and packaging design. 

lorin
lorin
Lorin font family

7. AS Grammatika

With a distinctly vintage-industrial edge, AS Grammatika pairs the neo-grotesque style of Helvetica with the condensed, Germanic style of D-Din

This is a no-frills, clinical take on the Helvetica tradition, with a sturdy and practical feel. Available in five weights, AS Grammatika is less rounded than some of the other fonts on this list, giving it a more digitised look. Perfect for signage or instructional content, this font would also be a good choice for corporate media. 

as grammatika
as grammatika
AS Grammatika font family

8. Neue Fofi

Designed by Arrtde, Neue Fofi is a geometric sans serif with a mid-century modern style. The rounded letters are slightly extended, giving the typeface a bouncy optimism. 

If you’re looking for a Helvetica alternative which has a more contemporary, open style, this typeface would be the perfect choice. Use it on branding projects or on websites to give them a friendly yet legible type style.  

neue fofi
neue fofi
Neue Fofi font family

9. Herz

Slightly condensed and with generous tracking, Herz is a grounded and simple take on the Helvetica style. 

Quirky curves on the letterforms give the typeface a distinctly contemporary edge, while it still retains a practicality and neutrality that would make it a good fit for a wide range of projects. 

herz
Herz font family

10. CA Saygon Text

Described as a ‘calmer’ version of its CA Saygon sibling, CA Saygon Text has been designed with easier reading in mind. Inspired by early grotesque typefaces such as Akzidenz Grotesk, the typeface nonetheless has a highly contemporary look, thanks in part to its high x-height. Letters like ‘f’ and ‘t’, which in other fonts might tend to end in curves, have been given right angles, giving a nod to current trends in typeface design.

CA Saygon Text is available in five unusual stylistic weights—Futura Style, Helvetica Style, Franklin Style, Cape Style, and Flat Style—giving it an incredibly diverse range of internal styles. 

saygon text
saygon text
CA Saygon Text font family

11. Hamlin

Hamlin is an ultra-minimal sans serif inspired by classic geometric typefaces. 

With rounded letterforms and unusual ‘kick-out’ angles on some of the uppercase letters, such as the ‘M’, Hamlin has an extremely clean and stylish look which would make it a beautiful choice for branding or logo design. 

hamlin
hamlin
Hamlin font family

12. Grotte

Available in three weights and able to support a wide range of languages, including Spanish, Portuguese, German, Danish, French, and Cyrillic, Grotte is a great Helvetica alternative for designers seeking a more adaptable multi-lingual font. 

With a slightly naive, rounded style, Grotte is also a more youthful take on the Swiss style of type design. 

grotte
grotte
Grotte font family

13. SOLO

Created by Unique Foundry, SOLO is a fresh and breezy take on the Helvetica style. The typeface is very beautiful and easy to read, with a little quirk added through soft stylistic curves added to some of the letterforms, such as the lowercase ‘a’. 

Download the desktop and web fonts, including OTF, TTF, EOT, SVG, and WOFF versions, from Envato Elements.

solo
solo
SOLO font family

14. Config

Config is a large geometric sans serif family consisting of 40 fonts in 10 weights, plus italic styles. The proportions of the typeface have been condensed by incorporating rigid sides on each letterform, creating a font that is sturdy and space-efficient. 

With a digitised, robotic look to the font, this typeface would be especially suited to app and website design, or for tech publications. 

Config also includes an Alt family with extended notch characters, making it ideal for adding visual interest to headlines and logos.

config
config
Config font family

15. Oxford

Described by its designer jenwagnerco as an ‘essential sans serif’, Oxford has a subtly hand-created quality which sets it apart from many of the other Helvetica alternatives on our list. 

While Oxford is quite a departure from the true Helvetica style, it retains the legibility, minimalism, and understated beauty of the Swiss style of type design. 

oxford
oxford
Oxford font family

Want to Learn More About Helvetica?

If you’re interested in learning more about Helvetica, why not check out our article on Everything You Wanted to Know About Helvetica or this great video by Envato’s YouTube channel:

Still Hunting for the Perfect Helvetica Font Alternative?

From the true-to-Helvetica styling of Noirden Sans to the ultra-minimal mood of Hamlin, and a range of other Helvetica alternatives in-between, we hope you’ve found a font similar to Helvetica in the list above that captures your imagination. 

If not, you can discover even more sans serif fonts on Envato Elements and GraphicRiver. Discover our essential edits of the best fonts to add to your collection below:

15 Fonts Similar to Helvetica

Post pobrano z: 15 Fonts Similar to Helvetica

Looking for fonts similar to Helvetica? Here you’ll find 15 cutting-edge alternatives to the designer’s favorite sans serif, the Helvetica typeface. 

exensa sans
Exensa Grotesk font family

From styles which lift inspiration from the Helvetica typeface to the closest fonts to Helvetica Neue, you’ll be sure to find a Helvetica alternative here that might convince you to switch loyalties from the original. 

A typeface with a longstanding reputation, Helvetica has had a huge influence on contemporary culture, inspiring a Helvetica shirt and even a Helvetica documentary. 

Looking for more sans serif fonts? Check out the wide range of modern and minimal fonts available for download on Envato Elements and GraphicRiver.

Fonts Similar to Helvetica: The Top 15

Below you’ll find 15 fonts similar to Helvetica, Helvetica Neue, and Arial. Dive in and discover these great alternatives inspired by International Style. 

1. VISIA Pro

A more rounded take on a geometric sans serif style, VISIA Pro balances friendly openness with professional minimalism. 

Ultra-legible and clear, this typeface would make a great Helvetica alternative for posters and signage. Download it from Envato Elements

visia pro
visia pro
VISIA Pro font family

2. Noirden Sans

Complete with six weights and an oblique option, Noirden Sans is a hard-working take on the authentic Helvetica style. Retaining the no-nonsense Swiss style of the Helvetica typeface, Noirden Sans is slightly more rounded, giving it a more contemporary feel.  

If you’re looking for a Helvetica alternative that is barely distinguishable from the original at first glance, Noirden Sans is a great pick. 

noirden sans
noirden pro
Noirden Sans font family

3. Bw Nista International

Designed by Alberto Ramanos, Bw Nista is a large family of three related typefaces—Grotesk, International, and Geometric. Bw Nista International takes its inspiration from the grid-based Swiss style of typographic design, making it more serious and retro in style than its Grotesk and Geometric relations. 

This clean and rational typeface is available in seven weights, from Thin to Black, with matching oblique italics, providing an exceptionally hard-working font for your projects.

bw nista
bw nista
Bw Nista font family

4. Exensa Grotesk

Described as an ‘authentic sans serif’ by its designers, foundry Fontastica, Exensa Grotesk is inspired by elegant, clean Swiss type design. 

With an almost compressed look to the lettering, Exensa is chunky and highly legible, making it a good all-round choice for both headlines and body text. 

exensa
exensa
Exensa Grotesk font family

5. Noveltica Nova Pro

A very elegant tribute to Swiss typography, Noveltica Nova Pro is a geometric sans in the tradition of Helvetica and Verdana. The uniformity of the height and width of the letterforms gives the typeface a neutral voice, making it the ideal partner for almost any kind of design project.

Pair the Light and Bold weights together to create high-impact headlines with an authentic Helvetica style. 

noveltica nova
noveltica nova
Noveltica Nova Pro font family

6. Lorin

More geometric in style than some of the fonts already discussed, Lorin is an ultra-contemporary sans serif with a clean and rounded style. 

Designed by foundry Fontastica, Lorin has a softer and more fashionable style than some of the more true-to-Helvetica typefaces, and as a result it makes the perfect alternative for projects which require a little more charm and personality, such as retail branding and packaging design. 

lorin
lorin
Lorin font family

7. AS Grammatika

With a distinctly vintage-industrial edge, AS Grammatika pairs the neo-grotesque style of Helvetica with the condensed, Germanic style of D-Din

This is a no-frills, clinical take on the Helvetica tradition, with a sturdy and practical feel. Available in five weights, AS Grammatika is less rounded than some of the other fonts on this list, giving it a more digitised look. Perfect for signage or instructional content, this font would also be a good choice for corporate media. 

as grammatika
as grammatika
AS Grammatika font family

8. Neue Fofi

Designed by Arrtde, Neue Fofi is a geometric sans serif with a mid-century modern style. The rounded letters are slightly extended, giving the typeface a bouncy optimism. 

If you’re looking for a Helvetica alternative which has a more contemporary, open style, this typeface would be the perfect choice. Use it on branding projects or on websites to give them a friendly yet legible type style.  

neue fofi
neue fofi
Neue Fofi font family

9. Herz

Slightly condensed and with generous tracking, Herz is a grounded and simple take on the Helvetica style. 

Quirky curves on the letterforms give the typeface a distinctly contemporary edge, while it still retains a practicality and neutrality that would make it a good fit for a wide range of projects. 

herz
Herz font family

10. CA Saygon Text

Described as a ‘calmer’ version of its CA Saygon sibling, CA Saygon Text has been designed with easier reading in mind. Inspired by early grotesque typefaces such as Akzidenz Grotesk, the typeface nonetheless has a highly contemporary look, thanks in part to its high x-height. Letters like ‘f’ and ‘t’, which in other fonts might tend to end in curves, have been given right angles, giving a nod to current trends in typeface design.

CA Saygon Text is available in five unusual stylistic weights—Futura Style, Helvetica Style, Franklin Style, Cape Style, and Flat Style—giving it an incredibly diverse range of internal styles. 

saygon text
saygon text
CA Saygon Text font family

11. Hamlin

Hamlin is an ultra-minimal sans serif inspired by classic geometric typefaces. 

With rounded letterforms and unusual ‘kick-out’ angles on some of the uppercase letters, such as the ‘M’, Hamlin has an extremely clean and stylish look which would make it a beautiful choice for branding or logo design. 

hamlin
hamlin
Hamlin font family

12. Grotte

Available in three weights and able to support a wide range of languages, including Spanish, Portuguese, German, Danish, French, and Cyrillic, Grotte is a great Helvetica alternative for designers seeking a more adaptable multi-lingual font. 

With a slightly naive, rounded style, Grotte is also a more youthful take on the Swiss style of type design. 

grotte
grotte
Grotte font family

13. SOLO

Created by Unique Foundry, SOLO is a fresh and breezy take on the Helvetica style. The typeface is very beautiful and easy to read, with a little quirk added through soft stylistic curves added to some of the letterforms, such as the lowercase ‘a’. 

Download the desktop and web fonts, including OTF, TTF, EOT, SVG, and WOFF versions, from Envato Elements.

solo
solo
SOLO font family

14. Config

Config is a large geometric sans serif family consisting of 40 fonts in 10 weights, plus italic styles. The proportions of the typeface have been condensed by incorporating rigid sides on each letterform, creating a font that is sturdy and space-efficient. 

With a digitised, robotic look to the font, this typeface would be especially suited to app and website design, or for tech publications. 

Config also includes an Alt family with extended notch characters, making it ideal for adding visual interest to headlines and logos.

config
config
Config font family

15. Oxford

Described by its designer jenwagnerco as an ‘essential sans serif’, Oxford has a subtly hand-created quality which sets it apart from many of the other Helvetica alternatives on our list. 

While Oxford is quite a departure from the true Helvetica style, it retains the legibility, minimalism, and understated beauty of the Swiss style of type design. 

oxford
oxford
Oxford font family

Want to Learn More About Helvetica?

If you’re interested in learning more about Helvetica, why not check out our article on Everything You Wanted to Know About Helvetica or this great video by Envato’s YouTube channel:

Still Hunting for the Perfect Helvetica Font Alternative?

From the true-to-Helvetica styling of Noirden Sans to the ultra-minimal mood of Hamlin, and a range of other Helvetica alternatives in-between, we hope you’ve found a font similar to Helvetica in the list above that captures your imagination. 

If not, you can discover even more sans serif fonts on Envato Elements and GraphicRiver. Discover our essential edits of the best fonts to add to your collection below:

15 Fonts Similar to Helvetica

Post pobrano z: 15 Fonts Similar to Helvetica

Looking for fonts similar to Helvetica? Here you’ll find 15 cutting-edge alternatives to the designer’s favorite sans serif, the Helvetica typeface. 

exensa sans
Exensa Grotesk font family

From styles which lift inspiration from the Helvetica typeface to the closest fonts to Helvetica Neue, you’ll be sure to find a Helvetica alternative here that might convince you to switch loyalties from the original. 

A typeface with a longstanding reputation, Helvetica has had a huge influence on contemporary culture, inspiring a Helvetica shirt and even a Helvetica documentary. 

Looking for more sans serif fonts? Check out the wide range of modern and minimal fonts available for download on Envato Elements and GraphicRiver.

Fonts Similar to Helvetica: The Top 15

Below you’ll find 15 fonts similar to Helvetica, Helvetica Neue, and Arial. Dive in and discover these great alternatives inspired by International Style. 

1. VISIA Pro

A more rounded take on a geometric sans serif style, VISIA Pro balances friendly openness with professional minimalism. 

Ultra-legible and clear, this typeface would make a great Helvetica alternative for posters and signage. Download it from Envato Elements

visia pro
visia pro
VISIA Pro font family

2. Noirden Sans

Complete with six weights and an oblique option, Noirden Sans is a hard-working take on the authentic Helvetica style. Retaining the no-nonsense Swiss style of the Helvetica typeface, Noirden Sans is slightly more rounded, giving it a more contemporary feel.  

If you’re looking for a Helvetica alternative that is barely distinguishable from the original at first glance, Noirden Sans is a great pick. 

noirden sans
noirden pro
Noirden Sans font family

3. Bw Nista International

Designed by Alberto Ramanos, Bw Nista is a large family of three related typefaces—Grotesk, International, and Geometric. Bw Nista International takes its inspiration from the grid-based Swiss style of typographic design, making it more serious and retro in style than its Grotesk and Geometric relations. 

This clean and rational typeface is available in seven weights, from Thin to Black, with matching oblique italics, providing an exceptionally hard-working font for your projects.

bw nista
bw nista
Bw Nista font family

4. Exensa Grotesk

Described as an ‘authentic sans serif’ by its designers, foundry Fontastica, Exensa Grotesk is inspired by elegant, clean Swiss type design. 

With an almost compressed look to the lettering, Exensa is chunky and highly legible, making it a good all-round choice for both headlines and body text. 

exensa
exensa
Exensa Grotesk font family

5. Noveltica Nova Pro

A very elegant tribute to Swiss typography, Noveltica Nova Pro is a geometric sans in the tradition of Helvetica and Verdana. The uniformity of the height and width of the letterforms gives the typeface a neutral voice, making it the ideal partner for almost any kind of design project.

Pair the Light and Bold weights together to create high-impact headlines with an authentic Helvetica style. 

noveltica nova
noveltica nova
Noveltica Nova Pro font family

6. Lorin

More geometric in style than some of the fonts already discussed, Lorin is an ultra-contemporary sans serif with a clean and rounded style. 

Designed by foundry Fontastica, Lorin has a softer and more fashionable style than some of the more true-to-Helvetica typefaces, and as a result it makes the perfect alternative for projects which require a little more charm and personality, such as retail branding and packaging design. 

lorin
lorin
Lorin font family

7. AS Grammatika

With a distinctly vintage-industrial edge, AS Grammatika pairs the neo-grotesque style of Helvetica with the condensed, Germanic style of D-Din

This is a no-frills, clinical take on the Helvetica tradition, with a sturdy and practical feel. Available in five weights, AS Grammatika is less rounded than some of the other fonts on this list, giving it a more digitised look. Perfect for signage or instructional content, this font would also be a good choice for corporate media. 

as grammatika
as grammatika
AS Grammatika font family

8. Neue Fofi

Designed by Arrtde, Neue Fofi is a geometric sans serif with a mid-century modern style. The rounded letters are slightly extended, giving the typeface a bouncy optimism. 

If you’re looking for a Helvetica alternative which has a more contemporary, open style, this typeface would be the perfect choice. Use it on branding projects or on websites to give them a friendly yet legible type style.  

neue fofi
neue fofi
Neue Fofi font family

9. Herz

Slightly condensed and with generous tracking, Herz is a grounded and simple take on the Helvetica style. 

Quirky curves on the letterforms give the typeface a distinctly contemporary edge, while it still retains a practicality and neutrality that would make it a good fit for a wide range of projects. 

herz
Herz font family

10. CA Saygon Text

Described as a ‘calmer’ version of its CA Saygon sibling, CA Saygon Text has been designed with easier reading in mind. Inspired by early grotesque typefaces such as Akzidenz Grotesk, the typeface nonetheless has a highly contemporary look, thanks in part to its high x-height. Letters like ‘f’ and ‘t’, which in other fonts might tend to end in curves, have been given right angles, giving a nod to current trends in typeface design.

CA Saygon Text is available in five unusual stylistic weights—Futura Style, Helvetica Style, Franklin Style, Cape Style, and Flat Style—giving it an incredibly diverse range of internal styles. 

saygon text
saygon text
CA Saygon Text font family

11. Hamlin

Hamlin is an ultra-minimal sans serif inspired by classic geometric typefaces. 

With rounded letterforms and unusual ‘kick-out’ angles on some of the uppercase letters, such as the ‘M’, Hamlin has an extremely clean and stylish look which would make it a beautiful choice for branding or logo design. 

hamlin
hamlin
Hamlin font family

12. Grotte

Available in three weights and able to support a wide range of languages, including Spanish, Portuguese, German, Danish, French, and Cyrillic, Grotte is a great Helvetica alternative for designers seeking a more adaptable multi-lingual font. 

With a slightly naive, rounded style, Grotte is also a more youthful take on the Swiss style of type design. 

grotte
grotte
Grotte font family

13. SOLO

Created by Unique Foundry, SOLO is a fresh and breezy take on the Helvetica style. The typeface is very beautiful and easy to read, with a little quirk added through soft stylistic curves added to some of the letterforms, such as the lowercase ‘a’. 

Download the desktop and web fonts, including OTF, TTF, EOT, SVG, and WOFF versions, from Envato Elements.

solo
solo
SOLO font family

14. Config

Config is a large geometric sans serif family consisting of 40 fonts in 10 weights, plus italic styles. The proportions of the typeface have been condensed by incorporating rigid sides on each letterform, creating a font that is sturdy and space-efficient. 

With a digitised, robotic look to the font, this typeface would be especially suited to app and website design, or for tech publications. 

Config also includes an Alt family with extended notch characters, making it ideal for adding visual interest to headlines and logos.

config
config
Config font family

15. Oxford

Described by its designer jenwagnerco as an ‘essential sans serif’, Oxford has a subtly hand-created quality which sets it apart from many of the other Helvetica alternatives on our list. 

While Oxford is quite a departure from the true Helvetica style, it retains the legibility, minimalism, and understated beauty of the Swiss style of type design. 

oxford
oxford
Oxford font family

Want to Learn More About Helvetica?

If you’re interested in learning more about Helvetica, why not check out our article on Everything You Wanted to Know About Helvetica or this great video by Envato’s YouTube channel:

Still Hunting for the Perfect Helvetica Font Alternative?

From the true-to-Helvetica styling of Noirden Sans to the ultra-minimal mood of Hamlin, and a range of other Helvetica alternatives in-between, we hope you’ve found a font similar to Helvetica in the list above that captures your imagination. 

If not, you can discover even more sans serif fonts on Envato Elements and GraphicRiver. Discover our essential edits of the best fonts to add to your collection below:

15 Fonts Similar to Helvetica

Post pobrano z: 15 Fonts Similar to Helvetica

Looking for fonts similar to Helvetica? Here you’ll find 15 cutting-edge alternatives to the designer’s favorite sans serif, the Helvetica typeface. 

exensa sans
Exensa Grotesk font family

From styles which lift inspiration from the Helvetica typeface to the closest fonts to Helvetica Neue, you’ll be sure to find a Helvetica alternative here that might convince you to switch loyalties from the original. 

A typeface with a longstanding reputation, Helvetica has had a huge influence on contemporary culture, inspiring a Helvetica shirt and even a Helvetica documentary. 

Looking for more sans serif fonts? Check out the wide range of modern and minimal fonts available for download on Envato Elements and GraphicRiver.

Fonts Similar to Helvetica: The Top 15

Below you’ll find 15 fonts similar to Helvetica, Helvetica Neue, and Arial. Dive in and discover these great alternatives inspired by International Style. 

1. VISIA Pro

A more rounded take on a geometric sans serif style, VISIA Pro balances friendly openness with professional minimalism. 

Ultra-legible and clear, this typeface would make a great Helvetica alternative for posters and signage. Download it from Envato Elements

visia pro
visia pro
VISIA Pro font family

2. Noirden Sans

Complete with six weights and an oblique option, Noirden Sans is a hard-working take on the authentic Helvetica style. Retaining the no-nonsense Swiss style of the Helvetica typeface, Noirden Sans is slightly more rounded, giving it a more contemporary feel.  

If you’re looking for a Helvetica alternative that is barely distinguishable from the original at first glance, Noirden Sans is a great pick. 

noirden sans
noirden pro
Noirden Sans font family

3. Bw Nista International

Designed by Alberto Ramanos, Bw Nista is a large family of three related typefaces—Grotesk, International, and Geometric. Bw Nista International takes its inspiration from the grid-based Swiss style of typographic design, making it more serious and retro in style than its Grotesk and Geometric relations. 

This clean and rational typeface is available in seven weights, from Thin to Black, with matching oblique italics, providing an exceptionally hard-working font for your projects.

bw nista
bw nista
Bw Nista font family

4. Exensa Grotesk

Described as an ‘authentic sans serif’ by its designers, foundry Fontastica, Exensa Grotesk is inspired by elegant, clean Swiss type design. 

With an almost compressed look to the lettering, Exensa is chunky and highly legible, making it a good all-round choice for both headlines and body text. 

exensa
exensa
Exensa Grotesk font family

5. Noveltica Nova Pro

A very elegant tribute to Swiss typography, Noveltica Nova Pro is a geometric sans in the tradition of Helvetica and Verdana. The uniformity of the height and width of the letterforms gives the typeface a neutral voice, making it the ideal partner for almost any kind of design project.

Pair the Light and Bold weights together to create high-impact headlines with an authentic Helvetica style. 

noveltica nova
noveltica nova
Noveltica Nova Pro font family

6. Lorin

More geometric in style than some of the fonts already discussed, Lorin is an ultra-contemporary sans serif with a clean and rounded style. 

Designed by foundry Fontastica, Lorin has a softer and more fashionable style than some of the more true-to-Helvetica typefaces, and as a result it makes the perfect alternative for projects which require a little more charm and personality, such as retail branding and packaging design. 

lorin
lorin
Lorin font family

7. AS Grammatika

With a distinctly vintage-industrial edge, AS Grammatika pairs the neo-grotesque style of Helvetica with the condensed, Germanic style of D-Din

This is a no-frills, clinical take on the Helvetica tradition, with a sturdy and practical feel. Available in five weights, AS Grammatika is less rounded than some of the other fonts on this list, giving it a more digitised look. Perfect for signage or instructional content, this font would also be a good choice for corporate media. 

as grammatika
as grammatika
AS Grammatika font family

8. Neue Fofi

Designed by Arrtde, Neue Fofi is a geometric sans serif with a mid-century modern style. The rounded letters are slightly extended, giving the typeface a bouncy optimism. 

If you’re looking for a Helvetica alternative which has a more contemporary, open style, this typeface would be the perfect choice. Use it on branding projects or on websites to give them a friendly yet legible type style.  

neue fofi
neue fofi
Neue Fofi font family

9. Herz

Slightly condensed and with generous tracking, Herz is a grounded and simple take on the Helvetica style. 

Quirky curves on the letterforms give the typeface a distinctly contemporary edge, while it still retains a practicality and neutrality that would make it a good fit for a wide range of projects. 

herz
Herz font family

10. CA Saygon Text

Described as a ‘calmer’ version of its CA Saygon sibling, CA Saygon Text has been designed with easier reading in mind. Inspired by early grotesque typefaces such as Akzidenz Grotesk, the typeface nonetheless has a highly contemporary look, thanks in part to its high x-height. Letters like ‘f’ and ‘t’, which in other fonts might tend to end in curves, have been given right angles, giving a nod to current trends in typeface design.

CA Saygon Text is available in five unusual stylistic weights—Futura Style, Helvetica Style, Franklin Style, Cape Style, and Flat Style—giving it an incredibly diverse range of internal styles. 

saygon text
saygon text
CA Saygon Text font family

11. Hamlin

Hamlin is an ultra-minimal sans serif inspired by classic geometric typefaces. 

With rounded letterforms and unusual ‘kick-out’ angles on some of the uppercase letters, such as the ‘M’, Hamlin has an extremely clean and stylish look which would make it a beautiful choice for branding or logo design. 

hamlin
hamlin
Hamlin font family

12. Grotte

Available in three weights and able to support a wide range of languages, including Spanish, Portuguese, German, Danish, French, and Cyrillic, Grotte is a great Helvetica alternative for designers seeking a more adaptable multi-lingual font. 

With a slightly naive, rounded style, Grotte is also a more youthful take on the Swiss style of type design. 

grotte
grotte
Grotte font family

13. SOLO

Created by Unique Foundry, SOLO is a fresh and breezy take on the Helvetica style. The typeface is very beautiful and easy to read, with a little quirk added through soft stylistic curves added to some of the letterforms, such as the lowercase ‘a’. 

Download the desktop and web fonts, including OTF, TTF, EOT, SVG, and WOFF versions, from Envato Elements.

solo
solo
SOLO font family

14. Config

Config is a large geometric sans serif family consisting of 40 fonts in 10 weights, plus italic styles. The proportions of the typeface have been condensed by incorporating rigid sides on each letterform, creating a font that is sturdy and space-efficient. 

With a digitised, robotic look to the font, this typeface would be especially suited to app and website design, or for tech publications. 

Config also includes an Alt family with extended notch characters, making it ideal for adding visual interest to headlines and logos.

config
config
Config font family

15. Oxford

Described by its designer jenwagnerco as an ‘essential sans serif’, Oxford has a subtly hand-created quality which sets it apart from many of the other Helvetica alternatives on our list. 

While Oxford is quite a departure from the true Helvetica style, it retains the legibility, minimalism, and understated beauty of the Swiss style of type design. 

oxford
oxford
Oxford font family

Want to Learn More About Helvetica?

If you’re interested in learning more about Helvetica, why not check out our article on Everything You Wanted to Know About Helvetica or this great video by Envato’s YouTube channel:

Still Hunting for the Perfect Helvetica Font Alternative?

From the true-to-Helvetica styling of Noirden Sans to the ultra-minimal mood of Hamlin, and a range of other Helvetica alternatives in-between, we hope you’ve found a font similar to Helvetica in the list above that captures your imagination. 

If not, you can discover even more sans serif fonts on Envato Elements and GraphicRiver. Discover our essential edits of the best fonts to add to your collection below:

How to Create Photoshop Brushes From an Old Newspaper

Post pobrano z: How to Create Photoshop Brushes From an Old Newspaper

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

In this tutorial, we will create a set of Photoshop brushes from an old newspaper, and then we will create a vintage paper texture using this set.

If you want to learn these techniques via video, check out our lesson on the Envato Tuts+ YouTube channel:

If you want to learn more about creating brushes or how to install Photoshop brushes, check out these tutorials:

Tutorial Assets

The following assets were used in the production of this tutorial:

1. How to Prepare the Document

Step 1

Press Control-O and then select the scanned image.

opening the image

Step 2

After that, we need to create a new document. Hit Control-N to create a new document and use the following settings:

  • 1500 x 1000 px
  • 300 dpi
  • Color Mode: RGB
Creating a new document

2. How to Create Photoshop Brushes From a Paper Texture

Step 1

Click M and select the Elliptical Marquee Tool. Then select an area in the bottom left corner of the document while holding Shift.

selecting the first area of texture

Step 2

Hit Control-C to copy that part of the texture, and then go to the tab with the document we’ve created and hit Control-V.

pasting the part of the texture to a new document

Step 3

Select another area in the right part of the document and create a copy of it as we did before.

selecting the second area of texture

Step 4

And for the last element, let’s take a part of the illustration.

selecting the third area of texture

Step 5

Now we can start to create the brushes. Select the first copy and convert the layer to black and white by pressing Alt-Control-Shift-B. Hit OK.

adding black and white filter to the layer

Step 6

After that, we need to add Auto Contrast to the layer by pressing Alt-Control-Shift-L.

adding auto contrast to the layer

Step 7

Then go to Select > Color Range and use the following settings: 

  • Select: Shadows
  • Fuzziness: 15%
  • Range: 65
creating a selection with color range

Step 8

Create a copy of the selection by pressing Control-C and then Control-V, and then delete the first layer.

creating a copy of the color range selection

Step 9

Now we need to add a Black and White Filter and Auto Contrast to the second layer, as we did before with the first layer.

adding filters to the second layer

Step 10

Go to Image > Adjustments > Threshold and set the Threshold Level to 120.

adding threshold filter to the layer

Step 11

Let’s create a selection using a color range again. Go to Select > Color Range and use the following settings:

  • Select: Highlights
  • Fuzziness: 0%
  • Range: 190
color range selection of the layer

Step 12

Hit the Delete button to remove the selection from the layer.

Step 13

Now we need to convert the last layer to black and white and then go to Image > Adjustments > Brightness/Contrast and use the following settings:

  • Brightness: 150
  • Contrast: 100
adding brightness contrast to the layer

Step 14

Go to Select > Color Range and use the following settings:

  • Select: Highlights
  • Fuzziness: 5%
  • Range: 190

Then remove the selected area using the Delete button.

selecting and removing white color from the layer

Step 15

Now we are ready to create the brush presets. Make all layers invisible except the first and go to Edit > Define Brush Preset, select any name you want to use for your brush, and hit the OK button. Then Define the second and the third brush presets the same way.

Creating the first brush preset

Step 16

Select the Brush Instrument and then select your first brush. After that, hit the Brush Settings icon.

opening the brush settings

Step 17

Put ticks on Shape Dynamics, Scattering, and Transfer, and use the following settings: 

  • Shape Dynamics: Angle Jitter: 100%
  • Scattering: Both Axes: On; Scatter: 390%; Count: 12
  • Transfer: Opacity Jitter: 100%; Flow Jitter: 100%
setting up the brush

Step 18

Create a new layer using Shift-Control-N and draw a texture with the brush using #ffbe88 for the color.

creating the first layer of the texture

Step 19

Select the second brush and put ticks on Shape Dynamics and Scattering, and then use the following settings: 

  • Shape Dynamics: Size Jitter: 100%; Angle Jitter: 100% 
  • Scattering: Both Axes: On; Scatter: 1000%; Count: 1
Setting up the second brush

Step 20

Create a new layer and change the Blending Mode of this layer to Soft Light, and then draw a texture with the brush we’ve created using black as the color.

creating the second layer of the texture

Step 21

And for the last brush, let’s use the following settings:

  • Shape Dynamics: Size Jitter: 100%; Angle Jitter: 100%
  • Scattering: Scatter: 425%; Count: 3
Setting up the third brush

Step 22

And for the last part of the texture, create a new layer and change the Blending Mode to Overlay. Then draw a texture on the layer with the last brush in black.

creating the last layer of the texture

Awesome Work, You’re Now Done!

Congratulations! You have created a grunge brush Photoshop set from an old scanned newspaper and made a vintage paper texture with this set of Photoshop brushes.

Here is our final result: 

texture created with the brushes

Now you can easily make textures using these brushes to create a vintage Photoshop effect or to add some final touches to your projects. If you’re looking for some more Photoshop brushes, then check out these amazing products on GraphicRiver:

Coffee and Paper Handcrafted Pack Volume 03

If you want to add some more grunge elements to your texture or create overlays for your image, then try this pack of 25 coffee stain brushes. This is a great tool to create a vintage Photoshop effect and make your artwork look grungy in a few simple clicks.

httpsgraphicrivernetitemcoffee-and-paper-handcrafted-pack-vol-0322138213

24 Distressed Texture Brushes

If you’re looking for some more brush texture sets, „24 Distressed Texture Brushes” is exactly what you need. This pack of Photoshop brushes could be used to create overlay elements for your photos or for creating text effects.

httpsgraphicrivernetitem24-distressed-texture-brushes11679624

50 Torn Paper Brushes

This awesome pack of Photoshop brushes contains not only 50 paper brush textures but also 8 JPEG textures. It’s a great tool for creating realistic paper elements for your design projects.

httpsgraphicrivernetitem50-torn-paper-brushes-8-textures5462654

9 Massive Grunge Brushes

In this pack, you will find a paintbrush Photoshop set, which could be a great tool for creating different types of artwork elements such as borders, frames, backgrounds, watercolor effects, and much more.

httpsgraphicrivernetitem9-massive-grunge-brushes-2000x20001595395

50 Vintage Brushes Set

Another great product is 50 Vintage Brushes Set, which contains five different types of Photoshop brushes, from noise to stains. It’s an easy tool to use for creating both overlays and textures.

httpsgraphicrivernetitem50-vintage-brushes-set8146217

Want to learn more about creating Photoshop brushes? Read these awesome tutorials:

How to Create Photoshop Brushes From an Old Newspaper

Post pobrano z: How to Create Photoshop Brushes From an Old Newspaper

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

In this tutorial, we will create a set of Photoshop brushes from an old newspaper, and then we will create a vintage paper texture using this set.

If you want to learn these techniques via video, check out our lesson on the Envato Tuts+ YouTube channel:

If you want to learn more about creating brushes or how to install Photoshop brushes, check out these tutorials:

Tutorial Assets

The following assets were used in the production of this tutorial:

1. How to Prepare the Document

Step 1

Press Control-O and then select the scanned image.

opening the image

Step 2

After that, we need to create a new document. Hit Control-N to create a new document and use the following settings:

  • 1500 x 1000 px
  • 300 dpi
  • Color Mode: RGB
Creating a new document

2. How to Create Photoshop Brushes From a Paper Texture

Step 1

Click M and select the Elliptical Marquee Tool. Then select an area in the bottom left corner of the document while holding Shift.

selecting the first area of texture

Step 2

Hit Control-C to copy that part of the texture, and then go to the tab with the document we’ve created and hit Control-V.

pasting the part of the texture to a new document

Step 3

Select another area in the right part of the document and create a copy of it as we did before.

selecting the second area of texture

Step 4

And for the last element, let’s take a part of the illustration.

selecting the third area of texture

Step 5

Now we can start to create the brushes. Select the first copy and convert the layer to black and white by pressing Alt-Control-Shift-B. Hit OK.

adding black and white filter to the layer

Step 6

After that, we need to add Auto Contrast to the layer by pressing Alt-Control-Shift-L.

adding auto contrast to the layer

Step 7

Then go to Select > Color Range and use the following settings: 

  • Select: Shadows
  • Fuzziness: 15%
  • Range: 65
creating a selection with color range

Step 8

Create a copy of the selection by pressing Control-C and then Control-V, and then delete the first layer.

creating a copy of the color range selection

Step 9

Now we need to add a Black and White Filter and Auto Contrast to the second layer, as we did before with the first layer.

adding filters to the second layer

Step 10

Go to Image > Adjustments > Threshold and set the Threshold Level to 120.

adding threshold filter to the layer

Step 11

Let’s create a selection using a color range again. Go to Select > Color Range and use the following settings:

  • Select: Highlights
  • Fuzziness: 0%
  • Range: 190
color range selection of the layer

Step 12

Hit the Delete button to remove the selection from the layer.

Step 13

Now we need to convert the last layer to black and white and then go to Image > Adjustments > Brightness/Contrast and use the following settings:

  • Brightness: 150
  • Contrast: 100
adding brightness contrast to the layer

Step 14

Go to Select > Color Range and use the following settings:

  • Select: Highlights
  • Fuzziness: 5%
  • Range: 190

Then remove the selected area using the Delete button.

selecting and removing white color from the layer

Step 15

Now we are ready to create the brush presets. Make all layers invisible except the first and go to Edit > Define Brush Preset, select any name you want to use for your brush, and hit the OK button. Then Define the second and the third brush presets the same way.

Creating the first brush preset

Step 16

Select the Brush Instrument and then select your first brush. After that, hit the Brush Settings icon.

opening the brush settings

Step 17

Put ticks on Shape Dynamics, Scattering, and Transfer, and use the following settings: 

  • Shape Dynamics: Angle Jitter: 100%
  • Scattering: Both Axes: On; Scatter: 390%; Count: 12
  • Transfer: Opacity Jitter: 100%; Flow Jitter: 100%
setting up the brush

Step 18

Create a new layer using Shift-Control-N and draw a texture with the brush using #ffbe88 for the color.

creating the first layer of the texture

Step 19

Select the second brush and put ticks on Shape Dynamics and Scattering, and then use the following settings: 

  • Shape Dynamics: Size Jitter: 100%; Angle Jitter: 100% 
  • Scattering: Both Axes: On; Scatter: 1000%; Count: 1
Setting up the second brush

Step 20

Create a new layer and change the Blending Mode of this layer to Soft Light, and then draw a texture with the brush we’ve created using black as the color.

creating the second layer of the texture

Step 21

And for the last brush, let’s use the following settings:

  • Shape Dynamics: Size Jitter: 100%; Angle Jitter: 100%
  • Scattering: Scatter: 425%; Count: 3
Setting up the third brush

Step 22

And for the last part of the texture, create a new layer and change the Blending Mode to Overlay. Then draw a texture on the layer with the last brush in black.

creating the last layer of the texture

Awesome Work, You’re Now Done!

Congratulations! You have created a grunge brush Photoshop set from an old scanned newspaper and made a vintage paper texture with this set of Photoshop brushes.

Here is our final result: 

texture created with the brushes

Now you can easily make textures using these brushes to create a vintage Photoshop effect or to add some final touches to your projects. If you’re looking for some more Photoshop brushes, then check out these amazing products on GraphicRiver:

Coffee and Paper Handcrafted Pack Volume 03

If you want to add some more grunge elements to your texture or create overlays for your image, then try this pack of 25 coffee stain brushes. This is a great tool to create a vintage Photoshop effect and make your artwork look grungy in a few simple clicks.

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24 Distressed Texture Brushes

If you’re looking for some more brush texture sets, „24 Distressed Texture Brushes” is exactly what you need. This pack of Photoshop brushes could be used to create overlay elements for your photos or for creating text effects.

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50 Torn Paper Brushes

This awesome pack of Photoshop brushes contains not only 50 paper brush textures but also 8 JPEG textures. It’s a great tool for creating realistic paper elements for your design projects.

httpsgraphicrivernetitem50-torn-paper-brushes-8-textures5462654

9 Massive Grunge Brushes

In this pack, you will find a paintbrush Photoshop set, which could be a great tool for creating different types of artwork elements such as borders, frames, backgrounds, watercolor effects, and much more.

httpsgraphicrivernetitem9-massive-grunge-brushes-2000x20001595395

50 Vintage Brushes Set

Another great product is 50 Vintage Brushes Set, which contains five different types of Photoshop brushes, from noise to stains. It’s an easy tool to use for creating both overlays and textures.

httpsgraphicrivernetitem50-vintage-brushes-set8146217

Want to learn more about creating Photoshop brushes? Read these awesome tutorials: