How to Create a Science Brochure Template in Adobe InDesign

Post pobrano z: How to Create a Science Brochure Template in Adobe InDesign

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

In this tutorial you’ll learn how to create a science brochure template with a colorful, on-trend style. You’ll pick up pro tips on how to make a brochure in InDesign, customising the design with your own content and preparing it for printing. 

This six-page, easy-to-create brochure design has a clean and modern style which can be adapted for scientific companies, medical businesses, beauty enterprises, or research laboratories. 

Ready to create your brochure design? Awesome, let’s dive in.

Looking for more editable brochure templates? These InDesign brochure templates on GraphicRiver and Envato Elements come in a huge range of customizable styles.

What You’ll Need 

As well as access to Adobe InDesign and Adobe Illustrator (or an alternative vector program), you’ll also need to download and install the following font and icon sets from Envato Elements to use in your brochure:

You can choose to use the photos used in the template as pictured or replace these with your own choice of images. The photos used in the template, as pictured here, are:

Once you’ve installed the font files on your computer and have your images to hand, you’re ready to start creating your brochure template.

1. How to Set Up the Brochure Template in InDesign

Step 1

Open InDesign and go to File > New > Document. 

Select Print from the Intent options at the top of the window, and choose Letter for the page size. 

Increase the number of Pages to 6 and make sure Facing Pages is checked. 

Set the Top and Outside Margins to 0.75 in, the Inside to 0.875 in, and the Bottom to 1 in. 

Add a Bleed of 0.25 in to all edges except the Inside edge, which you can keep to 0 in. Then click Create.

new document

Step 2

Go to the Layers panel (Window > Layers) and double-click on Layer 1, renaming it Photos

Create three more new layers—Color, Graphics, and Type

layer options type

Then lock all the layers except the Color layer. 

layers panel

Step 3

Expand the Swatches panel (Window > Color > Swatches) and choose New Color Swatch from the panel’s drop-down menu. 

Set the levels to C=56 M=0 Y=0 K=0, and click Add and Done.

Create three more CMYK swatches: 

  • C=14 M=34 Y=99 K=0
  • C=60 M=100 Y=1 K=0
  • C=2 M=85 Y=79 K=0
swatch options

2. How to Add Color to Your Brochure Template

Step 1

Working on the Color layer, switch to the Rectangle Tool (M) and drag to create a shape across the first page of your document, extending the edge up to the bleed and left page trim.

From the Swatches panel, set the Fill of the shape to red, C=2 M=85 Y=79 K=0. 

swatches panel

Step 2

Scroll down to the first two-page spread of your document, and create a colored rectangle over the left-hand page, setting the Fill to purple, C=60 M=100 Y=1 K=0.

purple fill color

Edit > Copy, Edit > Paste the rectangle, and move it over to the right-hand page. 

With this second shape selected, go to Object > Effects > Transparency. Set the Mode to Hard Light and bring the Opacity down to 75%. 

effects hard light

Step 3

Select and Copy both purple rectangles, and scroll down to the next spread of the document. 

Edit > Paste them, switching the opaque shape to the right side and the transparent one to the left side. 

transparency

Step 4

Create a final colored shape across the final page and back cover of the brochure, setting the Fill to red to match the front cover. 

colored rectangle

3. How to Create a Striking Design for Your Front Cover

Step 1

Scroll back up to the first page of the document, and lock the Color layer. Unlock the top layer, Type

Use the Type Tool (T) to create a large text frame across the top quarter of the page, typing in the title and setting the Font to Chronograph and a purple Font Color. 

header frame

Step 2

Copy and Paste the text frame a couple of times, arranging the copies in a row below the first, filling up the second quarter of the page. 

Be playful with the Font Color, applying a different color from your palette to one of the text frames. 

text frames

Step 3

Build up more text frames across the cover, creating four complete rows and varying the Font Color throughout. 

text frames

Step 4

Open the pack of laboratory icons in a vector program like Adobe Illustrator. 

Select one of the icons and Edit > Copy it. 

illustrator icons

Return to InDesign and lock the Type layer, unlocking the Graphics layer below. 

Edit > Paste the icon directly onto the page. Hold Shift while you resize it and position it playfully inside one of the letters on the cover. Adjust the Fill Color of the icon to match the letter. 

purple icon

Return to the vector pack again and choose a second icon, copying and pasting it across and adapting the Fill Color as before. 

vector icon

4. How to Create a Template Spread for Your Brochure

By creating a basic layout for a single spread in your brochure, you can use this as a basis for populating more pages in your document. 

Step 1

Scroll down to the first spread in your document. Remaining on the Graphics layer, Copy and Paste one of the icons across from the front cover, enlarging it and adjusting the Fill Color to pale blue. 

vector icon

Step 2

Lock the Graphics layer and unlock the top Type layer. 

Use the Type Tool (T) to create one or several frames for a header at the top of the spread. Type in the header and set the Font to Chronograph SemiBold and a contrasting Font Color. 

title header

Set a subtitle below also in Chronograph SemiBold, and the text in All Caps.

subheading

Step 3

Use the Type Tool (T) to create the first column for body text on the far left of the left-hand page.

Set the first paragraph in Chronograph Bold, All Caps, and a pale blue Font Color. 

body text frame

Set the remaining body text in Chronograph SemiBold and a [Paper] Font Color. 

body text

Step 4

Pick up any overflowing text from the first column text frame by clicking on the small square icon at the bottom-right of the text frame.

Click onto the page to create a second text frame, and resize it to create a second column on the left-hand page. 

Repeat to create more threaded columns on the right-hand page. 

threaded columns

Step 5

Create a pull quote by creating a separate text frame and setting the text inside to a larger Font Size.

Open the Text Wrap panel (Window > Text Wrap), click on the Wrap around Bounding Box option at the top of the window, and set the Offset width to 0.25 in. 

You can position the quote amongst the body text columns, pushing the text neatly away. 

text wrap
text wrap

Step 6

Lock the Type layer and unlock the bottom layer, Photos

Select the Rectangle Frame Tool (F) and drag across the page to create a whole-page image frame. 

image frame

File > Place, select an image, such as one of the faded lines backgrounds used here, and Open it, allowing it to fill the whole frame. 

faded lines image

Step 7

You can now use this spread as a basis for creating other spreads in your brochure. 

Unlock the Type and Graphics layers and select all the elements sitting on the spread. Copy them, scroll down to the next spread, and Edit > Paste in Place. 

Then you can start to play about with the arrangement of text on this second spread, as well as adjusting Font Color and the choice of icons, if needed, to create interest and contrast. 

quote on page
graphics

Create a new image frame on the left-hand page, beneath the transparent red rectangle, and File > Place a different image, such as this photo of a scientist.

scientist photo

Step 8

When you’ve finished populating the inside of your brochure, make sure to add a final touch to the back cover. 

The back cover is a good place to put contact details, for example. Set these in Chronograph SemiBold. 

contact page

5. How to Export Your Brochure Template for Printing

Step 1

Go to File > Export and choose Adobe PDF (Print) from the Format menu at the bottom of the window. 

Name the file and click Save

In the Export Adobe PDF window that opens, choose [Press Quality] from the Adobe PDF Preset menu at the top, and make sure the document is set to Export As Pages, not Spreads. 

press quality

Step 2

Click on Marks and Bleeds in the window’s left-hand menu, and check both All Printer’s Marks and Use Document Bleed Settings.

Then you’re ready to click Export and create your press-ready brochure file. 

export adobe pdf

Great job! You can send this PDF straight off to the printers. 

Conclusion: Your Finished Science Brochure Template

final brochure

This modern and stylish science brochure template can be used in its original style or as a versatile template for creating your own unique brochure design.

Why not try mixing up the fonts and color swatches for a fresh look?

Looking for more stylish brochure templates? These InDesign templates on GraphicRiver and Envato Elements come in a huge range of modern and customizable styles.

Don’t miss these brochure design tutorials and brochure templates for InDesign and Photoshop:

How to Create a Science Brochure Template in Adobe InDesign

Post pobrano z: How to Create a Science Brochure Template in Adobe InDesign

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

In this tutorial you’ll learn how to create a science brochure template with a colorful, on-trend style. You’ll pick up pro tips on how to make a brochure in InDesign, customising the design with your own content and preparing it for printing. 

This six-page, easy-to-create brochure design has a clean and modern style which can be adapted for scientific companies, medical businesses, beauty enterprises, or research laboratories. 

Ready to create your brochure design? Awesome, let’s dive in.

Looking for more editable brochure templates? These InDesign brochure templates on GraphicRiver and Envato Elements come in a huge range of customizable styles.

What You’ll Need 

As well as access to Adobe InDesign and Adobe Illustrator (or an alternative vector program), you’ll also need to download and install the following font and icon sets from Envato Elements to use in your brochure:

You can choose to use the photos used in the template as pictured or replace these with your own choice of images. The photos used in the template, as pictured here, are:

Once you’ve installed the font files on your computer and have your images to hand, you’re ready to start creating your brochure template.

1. How to Set Up the Brochure Template in InDesign

Step 1

Open InDesign and go to File > New > Document. 

Select Print from the Intent options at the top of the window, and choose Letter for the page size. 

Increase the number of Pages to 6 and make sure Facing Pages is checked. 

Set the Top and Outside Margins to 0.75 in, the Inside to 0.875 in, and the Bottom to 1 in. 

Add a Bleed of 0.25 in to all edges except the Inside edge, which you can keep to 0 in. Then click Create.

new document

Step 2

Go to the Layers panel (Window > Layers) and double-click on Layer 1, renaming it Photos

Create three more new layers—Color, Graphics, and Type

layer options type

Then lock all the layers except the Color layer. 

layers panel

Step 3

Expand the Swatches panel (Window > Color > Swatches) and choose New Color Swatch from the panel’s drop-down menu. 

Set the levels to C=56 M=0 Y=0 K=0, and click Add and Done.

Create three more CMYK swatches: 

  • C=14 M=34 Y=99 K=0
  • C=60 M=100 Y=1 K=0
  • C=2 M=85 Y=79 K=0
swatch options

2. How to Add Color to Your Brochure Template

Step 1

Working on the Color layer, switch to the Rectangle Tool (M) and drag to create a shape across the first page of your document, extending the edge up to the bleed and left page trim.

From the Swatches panel, set the Fill of the shape to red, C=2 M=85 Y=79 K=0. 

swatches panel

Step 2

Scroll down to the first two-page spread of your document, and create a colored rectangle over the left-hand page, setting the Fill to purple, C=60 M=100 Y=1 K=0.

purple fill color

Edit > Copy, Edit > Paste the rectangle, and move it over to the right-hand page. 

With this second shape selected, go to Object > Effects > Transparency. Set the Mode to Hard Light and bring the Opacity down to 75%. 

effects hard light

Step 3

Select and Copy both purple rectangles, and scroll down to the next spread of the document. 

Edit > Paste them, switching the opaque shape to the right side and the transparent one to the left side. 

transparency

Step 4

Create a final colored shape across the final page and back cover of the brochure, setting the Fill to red to match the front cover. 

colored rectangle

3. How to Create a Striking Design for Your Front Cover

Step 1

Scroll back up to the first page of the document, and lock the Color layer. Unlock the top layer, Type

Use the Type Tool (T) to create a large text frame across the top quarter of the page, typing in the title and setting the Font to Chronograph and a purple Font Color. 

header frame

Step 2

Copy and Paste the text frame a couple of times, arranging the copies in a row below the first, filling up the second quarter of the page. 

Be playful with the Font Color, applying a different color from your palette to one of the text frames. 

text frames

Step 3

Build up more text frames across the cover, creating four complete rows and varying the Font Color throughout. 

text frames

Step 4

Open the pack of laboratory icons in a vector program like Adobe Illustrator. 

Select one of the icons and Edit > Copy it. 

illustrator icons

Return to InDesign and lock the Type layer, unlocking the Graphics layer below. 

Edit > Paste the icon directly onto the page. Hold Shift while you resize it and position it playfully inside one of the letters on the cover. Adjust the Fill Color of the icon to match the letter. 

purple icon

Return to the vector pack again and choose a second icon, copying and pasting it across and adapting the Fill Color as before. 

vector icon

4. How to Create a Template Spread for Your Brochure

By creating a basic layout for a single spread in your brochure, you can use this as a basis for populating more pages in your document. 

Step 1

Scroll down to the first spread in your document. Remaining on the Graphics layer, Copy and Paste one of the icons across from the front cover, enlarging it and adjusting the Fill Color to pale blue. 

vector icon

Step 2

Lock the Graphics layer and unlock the top Type layer. 

Use the Type Tool (T) to create one or several frames for a header at the top of the spread. Type in the header and set the Font to Chronograph SemiBold and a contrasting Font Color. 

title header

Set a subtitle below also in Chronograph SemiBold, and the text in All Caps.

subheading

Step 3

Use the Type Tool (T) to create the first column for body text on the far left of the left-hand page.

Set the first paragraph in Chronograph Bold, All Caps, and a pale blue Font Color. 

body text frame

Set the remaining body text in Chronograph SemiBold and a [Paper] Font Color. 

body text

Step 4

Pick up any overflowing text from the first column text frame by clicking on the small square icon at the bottom-right of the text frame.

Click onto the page to create a second text frame, and resize it to create a second column on the left-hand page. 

Repeat to create more threaded columns on the right-hand page. 

threaded columns

Step 5

Create a pull quote by creating a separate text frame and setting the text inside to a larger Font Size.

Open the Text Wrap panel (Window > Text Wrap), click on the Wrap around Bounding Box option at the top of the window, and set the Offset width to 0.25 in. 

You can position the quote amongst the body text columns, pushing the text neatly away. 

text wrap
text wrap

Step 6

Lock the Type layer and unlock the bottom layer, Photos

Select the Rectangle Frame Tool (F) and drag across the page to create a whole-page image frame. 

image frame

File > Place, select an image, such as one of the faded lines backgrounds used here, and Open it, allowing it to fill the whole frame. 

faded lines image

Step 7

You can now use this spread as a basis for creating other spreads in your brochure. 

Unlock the Type and Graphics layers and select all the elements sitting on the spread. Copy them, scroll down to the next spread, and Edit > Paste in Place. 

Then you can start to play about with the arrangement of text on this second spread, as well as adjusting Font Color and the choice of icons, if needed, to create interest and contrast. 

quote on page
graphics

Create a new image frame on the left-hand page, beneath the transparent red rectangle, and File > Place a different image, such as this photo of a scientist.

scientist photo

Step 8

When you’ve finished populating the inside of your brochure, make sure to add a final touch to the back cover. 

The back cover is a good place to put contact details, for example. Set these in Chronograph SemiBold. 

contact page

5. How to Export Your Brochure Template for Printing

Step 1

Go to File > Export and choose Adobe PDF (Print) from the Format menu at the bottom of the window. 

Name the file and click Save

In the Export Adobe PDF window that opens, choose [Press Quality] from the Adobe PDF Preset menu at the top, and make sure the document is set to Export As Pages, not Spreads. 

press quality

Step 2

Click on Marks and Bleeds in the window’s left-hand menu, and check both All Printer’s Marks and Use Document Bleed Settings.

Then you’re ready to click Export and create your press-ready brochure file. 

export adobe pdf

Great job! You can send this PDF straight off to the printers. 

Conclusion: Your Finished Science Brochure Template

final brochure

This modern and stylish science brochure template can be used in its original style or as a versatile template for creating your own unique brochure design.

Why not try mixing up the fonts and color swatches for a fresh look?

Looking for more stylish brochure templates? These InDesign templates on GraphicRiver and Envato Elements come in a huge range of modern and customizable styles.

Don’t miss these brochure design tutorials and brochure templates for InDesign and Photoshop:

How to Create a Science Brochure Template in Adobe InDesign

Post pobrano z: How to Create a Science Brochure Template in Adobe InDesign

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

In this tutorial you’ll learn how to create a science brochure template with a colorful, on-trend style. You’ll pick up pro tips on how to make a brochure in InDesign, customising the design with your own content and preparing it for printing. 

This six-page, easy-to-create brochure design has a clean and modern style which can be adapted for scientific companies, medical businesses, beauty enterprises, or research laboratories. 

Ready to create your brochure design? Awesome, let’s dive in.

Looking for more editable brochure templates? These InDesign brochure templates on GraphicRiver and Envato Elements come in a huge range of customizable styles.

What You’ll Need 

As well as access to Adobe InDesign and Adobe Illustrator (or an alternative vector program), you’ll also need to download and install the following font and icon sets from Envato Elements to use in your brochure:

You can choose to use the photos used in the template as pictured or replace these with your own choice of images. The photos used in the template, as pictured here, are:

Once you’ve installed the font files on your computer and have your images to hand, you’re ready to start creating your brochure template.

1. How to Set Up the Brochure Template in InDesign

Step 1

Open InDesign and go to File > New > Document. 

Select Print from the Intent options at the top of the window, and choose Letter for the page size. 

Increase the number of Pages to 6 and make sure Facing Pages is checked. 

Set the Top and Outside Margins to 0.75 in, the Inside to 0.875 in, and the Bottom to 1 in. 

Add a Bleed of 0.25 in to all edges except the Inside edge, which you can keep to 0 in. Then click Create.

new document

Step 2

Go to the Layers panel (Window > Layers) and double-click on Layer 1, renaming it Photos

Create three more new layers—Color, Graphics, and Type

layer options type

Then lock all the layers except the Color layer. 

layers panel

Step 3

Expand the Swatches panel (Window > Color > Swatches) and choose New Color Swatch from the panel’s drop-down menu. 

Set the levels to C=56 M=0 Y=0 K=0, and click Add and Done.

Create three more CMYK swatches: 

  • C=14 M=34 Y=99 K=0
  • C=60 M=100 Y=1 K=0
  • C=2 M=85 Y=79 K=0
swatch options

2. How to Add Color to Your Brochure Template

Step 1

Working on the Color layer, switch to the Rectangle Tool (M) and drag to create a shape across the first page of your document, extending the edge up to the bleed and left page trim.

From the Swatches panel, set the Fill of the shape to red, C=2 M=85 Y=79 K=0. 

swatches panel

Step 2

Scroll down to the first two-page spread of your document, and create a colored rectangle over the left-hand page, setting the Fill to purple, C=60 M=100 Y=1 K=0.

purple fill color

Edit > Copy, Edit > Paste the rectangle, and move it over to the right-hand page. 

With this second shape selected, go to Object > Effects > Transparency. Set the Mode to Hard Light and bring the Opacity down to 75%. 

effects hard light

Step 3

Select and Copy both purple rectangles, and scroll down to the next spread of the document. 

Edit > Paste them, switching the opaque shape to the right side and the transparent one to the left side. 

transparency

Step 4

Create a final colored shape across the final page and back cover of the brochure, setting the Fill to red to match the front cover. 

colored rectangle

3. How to Create a Striking Design for Your Front Cover

Step 1

Scroll back up to the first page of the document, and lock the Color layer. Unlock the top layer, Type

Use the Type Tool (T) to create a large text frame across the top quarter of the page, typing in the title and setting the Font to Chronograph and a purple Font Color. 

header frame

Step 2

Copy and Paste the text frame a couple of times, arranging the copies in a row below the first, filling up the second quarter of the page. 

Be playful with the Font Color, applying a different color from your palette to one of the text frames. 

text frames

Step 3

Build up more text frames across the cover, creating four complete rows and varying the Font Color throughout. 

text frames

Step 4

Open the pack of laboratory icons in a vector program like Adobe Illustrator. 

Select one of the icons and Edit > Copy it. 

illustrator icons

Return to InDesign and lock the Type layer, unlocking the Graphics layer below. 

Edit > Paste the icon directly onto the page. Hold Shift while you resize it and position it playfully inside one of the letters on the cover. Adjust the Fill Color of the icon to match the letter. 

purple icon

Return to the vector pack again and choose a second icon, copying and pasting it across and adapting the Fill Color as before. 

vector icon

4. How to Create a Template Spread for Your Brochure

By creating a basic layout for a single spread in your brochure, you can use this as a basis for populating more pages in your document. 

Step 1

Scroll down to the first spread in your document. Remaining on the Graphics layer, Copy and Paste one of the icons across from the front cover, enlarging it and adjusting the Fill Color to pale blue. 

vector icon

Step 2

Lock the Graphics layer and unlock the top Type layer. 

Use the Type Tool (T) to create one or several frames for a header at the top of the spread. Type in the header and set the Font to Chronograph SemiBold and a contrasting Font Color. 

title header

Set a subtitle below also in Chronograph SemiBold, and the text in All Caps.

subheading

Step 3

Use the Type Tool (T) to create the first column for body text on the far left of the left-hand page.

Set the first paragraph in Chronograph Bold, All Caps, and a pale blue Font Color. 

body text frame

Set the remaining body text in Chronograph SemiBold and a [Paper] Font Color. 

body text

Step 4

Pick up any overflowing text from the first column text frame by clicking on the small square icon at the bottom-right of the text frame.

Click onto the page to create a second text frame, and resize it to create a second column on the left-hand page. 

Repeat to create more threaded columns on the right-hand page. 

threaded columns

Step 5

Create a pull quote by creating a separate text frame and setting the text inside to a larger Font Size.

Open the Text Wrap panel (Window > Text Wrap), click on the Wrap around Bounding Box option at the top of the window, and set the Offset width to 0.25 in. 

You can position the quote amongst the body text columns, pushing the text neatly away. 

text wrap
text wrap

Step 6

Lock the Type layer and unlock the bottom layer, Photos

Select the Rectangle Frame Tool (F) and drag across the page to create a whole-page image frame. 

image frame

File > Place, select an image, such as one of the faded lines backgrounds used here, and Open it, allowing it to fill the whole frame. 

faded lines image

Step 7

You can now use this spread as a basis for creating other spreads in your brochure. 

Unlock the Type and Graphics layers and select all the elements sitting on the spread. Copy them, scroll down to the next spread, and Edit > Paste in Place. 

Then you can start to play about with the arrangement of text on this second spread, as well as adjusting Font Color and the choice of icons, if needed, to create interest and contrast. 

quote on page
graphics

Create a new image frame on the left-hand page, beneath the transparent red rectangle, and File > Place a different image, such as this photo of a scientist.

scientist photo

Step 8

When you’ve finished populating the inside of your brochure, make sure to add a final touch to the back cover. 

The back cover is a good place to put contact details, for example. Set these in Chronograph SemiBold. 

contact page

5. How to Export Your Brochure Template for Printing

Step 1

Go to File > Export and choose Adobe PDF (Print) from the Format menu at the bottom of the window. 

Name the file and click Save

In the Export Adobe PDF window that opens, choose [Press Quality] from the Adobe PDF Preset menu at the top, and make sure the document is set to Export As Pages, not Spreads. 

press quality

Step 2

Click on Marks and Bleeds in the window’s left-hand menu, and check both All Printer’s Marks and Use Document Bleed Settings.

Then you’re ready to click Export and create your press-ready brochure file. 

export adobe pdf

Great job! You can send this PDF straight off to the printers. 

Conclusion: Your Finished Science Brochure Template

final brochure

This modern and stylish science brochure template can be used in its original style or as a versatile template for creating your own unique brochure design.

Why not try mixing up the fonts and color swatches for a fresh look?

Looking for more stylish brochure templates? These InDesign templates on GraphicRiver and Envato Elements come in a huge range of modern and customizable styles.

Don’t miss these brochure design tutorials and brochure templates for InDesign and Photoshop:

How to Create a Science Brochure Template in Adobe InDesign

Post pobrano z: How to Create a Science Brochure Template in Adobe InDesign

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

In this tutorial you’ll learn how to create a science brochure template with a colorful, on-trend style. You’ll pick up pro tips on how to make a brochure in InDesign, customising the design with your own content and preparing it for printing. 

This six-page, easy-to-create brochure design has a clean and modern style which can be adapted for scientific companies, medical businesses, beauty enterprises, or research laboratories. 

Ready to create your brochure design? Awesome, let’s dive in.

Looking for more editable brochure templates? These InDesign brochure templates on GraphicRiver and Envato Elements come in a huge range of customizable styles.

What You’ll Need 

As well as access to Adobe InDesign and Adobe Illustrator (or an alternative vector program), you’ll also need to download and install the following font and icon sets from Envato Elements to use in your brochure:

You can choose to use the photos used in the template as pictured or replace these with your own choice of images. The photos used in the template, as pictured here, are:

Once you’ve installed the font files on your computer and have your images to hand, you’re ready to start creating your brochure template.

1. How to Set Up the Brochure Template in InDesign

Step 1

Open InDesign and go to File > New > Document. 

Select Print from the Intent options at the top of the window, and choose Letter for the page size. 

Increase the number of Pages to 6 and make sure Facing Pages is checked. 

Set the Top and Outside Margins to 0.75 in, the Inside to 0.875 in, and the Bottom to 1 in. 

Add a Bleed of 0.25 in to all edges except the Inside edge, which you can keep to 0 in. Then click Create.

new document

Step 2

Go to the Layers panel (Window > Layers) and double-click on Layer 1, renaming it Photos

Create three more new layers—Color, Graphics, and Type

layer options type

Then lock all the layers except the Color layer. 

layers panel

Step 3

Expand the Swatches panel (Window > Color > Swatches) and choose New Color Swatch from the panel’s drop-down menu. 

Set the levels to C=56 M=0 Y=0 K=0, and click Add and Done.

Create three more CMYK swatches: 

  • C=14 M=34 Y=99 K=0
  • C=60 M=100 Y=1 K=0
  • C=2 M=85 Y=79 K=0
swatch options

2. How to Add Color to Your Brochure Template

Step 1

Working on the Color layer, switch to the Rectangle Tool (M) and drag to create a shape across the first page of your document, extending the edge up to the bleed and left page trim.

From the Swatches panel, set the Fill of the shape to red, C=2 M=85 Y=79 K=0. 

swatches panel

Step 2

Scroll down to the first two-page spread of your document, and create a colored rectangle over the left-hand page, setting the Fill to purple, C=60 M=100 Y=1 K=0.

purple fill color

Edit > Copy, Edit > Paste the rectangle, and move it over to the right-hand page. 

With this second shape selected, go to Object > Effects > Transparency. Set the Mode to Hard Light and bring the Opacity down to 75%. 

effects hard light

Step 3

Select and Copy both purple rectangles, and scroll down to the next spread of the document. 

Edit > Paste them, switching the opaque shape to the right side and the transparent one to the left side. 

transparency

Step 4

Create a final colored shape across the final page and back cover of the brochure, setting the Fill to red to match the front cover. 

colored rectangle

3. How to Create a Striking Design for Your Front Cover

Step 1

Scroll back up to the first page of the document, and lock the Color layer. Unlock the top layer, Type

Use the Type Tool (T) to create a large text frame across the top quarter of the page, typing in the title and setting the Font to Chronograph and a purple Font Color. 

header frame

Step 2

Copy and Paste the text frame a couple of times, arranging the copies in a row below the first, filling up the second quarter of the page. 

Be playful with the Font Color, applying a different color from your palette to one of the text frames. 

text frames

Step 3

Build up more text frames across the cover, creating four complete rows and varying the Font Color throughout. 

text frames

Step 4

Open the pack of laboratory icons in a vector program like Adobe Illustrator. 

Select one of the icons and Edit > Copy it. 

illustrator icons

Return to InDesign and lock the Type layer, unlocking the Graphics layer below. 

Edit > Paste the icon directly onto the page. Hold Shift while you resize it and position it playfully inside one of the letters on the cover. Adjust the Fill Color of the icon to match the letter. 

purple icon

Return to the vector pack again and choose a second icon, copying and pasting it across and adapting the Fill Color as before. 

vector icon

4. How to Create a Template Spread for Your Brochure

By creating a basic layout for a single spread in your brochure, you can use this as a basis for populating more pages in your document. 

Step 1

Scroll down to the first spread in your document. Remaining on the Graphics layer, Copy and Paste one of the icons across from the front cover, enlarging it and adjusting the Fill Color to pale blue. 

vector icon

Step 2

Lock the Graphics layer and unlock the top Type layer. 

Use the Type Tool (T) to create one or several frames for a header at the top of the spread. Type in the header and set the Font to Chronograph SemiBold and a contrasting Font Color. 

title header

Set a subtitle below also in Chronograph SemiBold, and the text in All Caps.

subheading

Step 3

Use the Type Tool (T) to create the first column for body text on the far left of the left-hand page.

Set the first paragraph in Chronograph Bold, All Caps, and a pale blue Font Color. 

body text frame

Set the remaining body text in Chronograph SemiBold and a [Paper] Font Color. 

body text

Step 4

Pick up any overflowing text from the first column text frame by clicking on the small square icon at the bottom-right of the text frame.

Click onto the page to create a second text frame, and resize it to create a second column on the left-hand page. 

Repeat to create more threaded columns on the right-hand page. 

threaded columns

Step 5

Create a pull quote by creating a separate text frame and setting the text inside to a larger Font Size.

Open the Text Wrap panel (Window > Text Wrap), click on the Wrap around Bounding Box option at the top of the window, and set the Offset width to 0.25 in. 

You can position the quote amongst the body text columns, pushing the text neatly away. 

text wrap
text wrap

Step 6

Lock the Type layer and unlock the bottom layer, Photos

Select the Rectangle Frame Tool (F) and drag across the page to create a whole-page image frame. 

image frame

File > Place, select an image, such as one of the faded lines backgrounds used here, and Open it, allowing it to fill the whole frame. 

faded lines image

Step 7

You can now use this spread as a basis for creating other spreads in your brochure. 

Unlock the Type and Graphics layers and select all the elements sitting on the spread. Copy them, scroll down to the next spread, and Edit > Paste in Place. 

Then you can start to play about with the arrangement of text on this second spread, as well as adjusting Font Color and the choice of icons, if needed, to create interest and contrast. 

quote on page
graphics

Create a new image frame on the left-hand page, beneath the transparent red rectangle, and File > Place a different image, such as this photo of a scientist.

scientist photo

Step 8

When you’ve finished populating the inside of your brochure, make sure to add a final touch to the back cover. 

The back cover is a good place to put contact details, for example. Set these in Chronograph SemiBold. 

contact page

5. How to Export Your Brochure Template for Printing

Step 1

Go to File > Export and choose Adobe PDF (Print) from the Format menu at the bottom of the window. 

Name the file and click Save

In the Export Adobe PDF window that opens, choose [Press Quality] from the Adobe PDF Preset menu at the top, and make sure the document is set to Export As Pages, not Spreads. 

press quality

Step 2

Click on Marks and Bleeds in the window’s left-hand menu, and check both All Printer’s Marks and Use Document Bleed Settings.

Then you’re ready to click Export and create your press-ready brochure file. 

export adobe pdf

Great job! You can send this PDF straight off to the printers. 

Conclusion: Your Finished Science Brochure Template

final brochure

This modern and stylish science brochure template can be used in its original style or as a versatile template for creating your own unique brochure design.

Why not try mixing up the fonts and color swatches for a fresh look?

Looking for more stylish brochure templates? These InDesign templates on GraphicRiver and Envato Elements come in a huge range of modern and customizable styles.

Don’t miss these brochure design tutorials and brochure templates for InDesign and Photoshop:

How to Create an Underwater Text Effect in Photoshop

Post pobrano z: How to Create an Underwater Text Effect in Photoshop

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

Water can make for such beautiful, inspiring visuals! In this tutorial, we’ll take some text and visually „place it” underwater—creating a wavy text effect, looking down and into the water, with the text visually beneath. 

What You’ll Need

The followings assets are used within this tutorial:

Now, let’s dig right in and start experimenting with some type! 

1. How to Add Text and Texture to a Document

Step 1

Start with a New Document—any size here will do! 

Keep the scope of your project in mind: are you hoping to create something print ready or something for use online? I’m going to work at 850 x 650 for this example, but you might want to work at a higher resolution, if you’d like to print your work.

Once you’re happy with your settings, click OK.

New Document Example

Step 2

Next, Paste your watery background image into your document. In this case, we’ll be using this Water Stock Photo from Envato Elements, but you could use any image you like!

This is going to be the water that we’ll base our text on. 

Example of Stock Water Imagery

Step 3

Now, let’s add the text. Simply type out whatever text you’d like, using the Text Tool, in your font of choice. In the case of this example, I’ll be using the font Fibre Vintage

Don’t worry about effects or positioning or anything, at this point—just put down the text you’d like first!

I decided to make two different Text Layers. You can make as many as you like. Make the text a dark gray color. 

Example Text

Step 4

Next, make your Text Layer (or Layers) into a Smart Object

To do so, select the applicable Layers, Right-Click (on PC) or Control-Click (on Mac) and select Create Smart Object from the drop-down menu.

We’ll be applying effects to this Smart Object. We’ll be able to more easily preserve and alter the original text this way, if needed.

Creating a Smart Object

Step 5

Rotate and position the text however you’d like it, against the water. I opted to rotate it a little, so the shot feels a little more natural. 

Rotating and Position the Text

Step 6

Now, set this layer’s Blending Mode to Overlay. You’ll notice that this changes the text’s appearance on the water. 

Setting the Blending Mode to Overlay

2. How to Create an Underwater Effect

Step 1

One of the major goals here is to have the text appear to be affected by the water. We could do this in a number of ways—like using the Warp Tools, Distort Filters… there are plenty of options! However, in this case, let’s try out the Displace Filter

First, select the layer with the water background in it. Click on the thumbnail on the layer to select the content (or press Command-A (on Mac) or Control-A (on PC). 

Now, Create a New Document. Paste this image and Save this document. I called my document „displace.psd”, but you are welcome to call yours whatever you prefer. 

Displace Imagery

Step 2

Now, let’s go back to our original document. 

Select the layer with our Smart Object. Then, select Filter > Distort > Displace

Displace Filter

Step 3

Then, you’ll see this popup dialog box. I went with a Horizontal and Vertical Scale of 10, but I would encourage you to experiment with this! I also chose Stretch to Fit, as I’d like the area to be similar to the original background image we’ve used here. 

When you’re happy with your settings, click OK. Remember, if you don’t like the result, you can always Undo (Control-Z on PC, Command-Z on Mac) and try out different values. I often like to experiment a few times.

Select your displace.psd file created earlier as the file that the Displace Filter will use to create this effect. 

Displace Pop Up Dialog Box

Step 4

And here’s what the text looks like with this effect applied. It’s getting closer to what we want, but it still looks kind of clear, doesn’t it? We’d expect to see some blur here, as the water is between us and the water on the ground.

Let’s apply a Gaussian Blur to this Smart Object. Go to Filter > Blur > Gaussian Blur.

Gaussian Blur

Step 5

I went with 2.0 on the radius here, but you may prefer more or less. I’d recommend something that gives it a little bit of a blur, but also stays legible. A lot of blur might look good, but if we can’t read the text well, that might defeat our purpose.

Click OK when you’re happy with the value you’ve chosen. Remember, you can also undo and try again, if you change your mind.

Gaussian Blur Options

3. How to Add the Finishing Touches

Step 1

So, we’ve got the beginnings of what we’d like to do here—but let’s push it forward and do some more with it. 

Personally, I’d like the text to be darker. We have a few options here. 

I Duplicated the Smart Object Layer twice, leaving the Blending Mode on each set to Overlay. The result was just what I was looking for.

Duplicating Text Layers

Step 2

However, because we put this type into a Smart Object, we can go back and change it any time we like. Double-click on the thumbnail to open up the Smart Object.

You’ll notice that it contains the text as we originally had it in our document. You can make changes here—like the text color or the text itself. Then, when you save it, this will be reflected in our document.

Inside the Smart Object

Step 3

On a side note, keep in mind that these changes might have to be accounted for! For example, changing the color might affect the blending modes—if I make the text light pink, I need to adjust for that (since we worked with a color with a dark value originally). 

In that scenario, I’d just drop my extra Overlay layers and set the Smart Object Layer to Color Burn, Opacity 75%. Voila, we have a similar effect. 

Altering the Smart Object

Step 4

Made any changes that you don’t want to keep? Simply undo! Within the Smart Object, make sure to save any changes. 

To wrap up, I’m going back to the original color and Blending Modes we were working with earlier. 

Original Blending Modes and Color Choices

Step 5

Finally, I wanted to do a little adjustment here. I copied the water Background Layer and brought it to the front of my Layers. Then, I set the Blending Mode to Screen, Opacity 20%. I just wanted to lighten things up a little.

However, I recommend experimenting with Blending Modes—check out how it looks with Color Dodge or Color Burn! Experimenting with Blending Modes is a great way to get more familiar with them. 

Duplicated Water Background Set to Screen

And Now Our Text Is Underwater!

I hope you enjoyed walking through this text effect with me—and I hope you have a lot of fun experimenting with it and making your own underwater text effect Photoshop creations! Again, there are a lot of different ways to distort your text—want to know how to warp text in Photoshop even further? If you’d like to make even more adjustments, I’d recommend taking a look at Edit > Transform > Warp

Thanks for following along with me! Good luck with your creative projects!

underwater text effect photoshop

Love text effects and want to check out more you can experiment with—right now? Check out these other text effects that are ready made and ready to go.

Vintage Text Effects Vol.3

Check out this collection of Vintage Text Effects! There are so many colorful, whimsical, and interesting options to choose from here, perfect for a variety of potential projects. 

Vintage Text Effects

80s Text Effects Vol.1

I don’t know about you, but I love the 80s—and I love these awesome 80s text effects! Check out all the saturated colors, the glam, and the sleek, retro style! I’m already thinking about all the cool things I’d love to try out with these. 

80s Text Effects

Metal Layer Styles – Photoshop Gold Text Effect

These text effects are awesome—and they don’t just come in gold. There’s chrome, bronze, steel… plenty to choose from in these easy-to-use Layer Styles. 

Metal Text Effect

3D Text Effects Vol.3

There are so many fun effects to choose from in this third volume of 3D Text Effects! Easily replace the text with Smart Objects—a snap, right? Check out Volume 1 and Volume 2 for even more effects to try out!

3D Text Effects

100 Photoshop Layer Styles Bundle – Text Effect

This is a giant collection of Photoshop text effects—plenty to play and experiment with! From textured effects and slimy text effects to fire text effects, this one contains a little bit of everything! What an awesome addition to any collection!

100 Text Effects Bundle

If you enjoyed this tutorial, check out these others! Happy creating!

How to Create an Underwater Text Effect in Photoshop

Post pobrano z: How to Create an Underwater Text Effect in Photoshop

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

Water can make for such beautiful, inspiring visuals! In this tutorial, we’ll take some text and visually „place it” underwater—creating a wavy text effect, looking down and into the water, with the text visually beneath. 

What You’ll Need

The followings assets are used within this tutorial:

Now, let’s dig right in and start experimenting with some type! 

1. How to Add Text and Texture to a Document

Step 1

Start with a New Document—any size here will do! 

Keep the scope of your project in mind: are you hoping to create something print ready or something for use online? I’m going to work at 850 x 650 for this example, but you might want to work at a higher resolution, if you’d like to print your work.

Once you’re happy with your settings, click OK.

New Document Example

Step 2

Next, Paste your watery background image into your document. In this case, we’ll be using this Water Stock Photo from Envato Elements, but you could use any image you like!

This is going to be the water that we’ll base our text on. 

Example of Stock Water Imagery

Step 3

Now, let’s add the text. Simply type out whatever text you’d like, using the Text Tool, in your font of choice. In the case of this example, I’ll be using the font Fibre Vintage

Don’t worry about effects or positioning or anything, at this point—just put down the text you’d like first!

I decided to make two different Text Layers. You can make as many as you like. Make the text a dark gray color. 

Example Text

Step 4

Next, make your Text Layer (or Layers) into a Smart Object

To do so, select the applicable Layers, Right-Click (on PC) or Control-Click (on Mac) and select Create Smart Object from the drop-down menu.

We’ll be applying effects to this Smart Object. We’ll be able to more easily preserve and alter the original text this way, if needed.

Creating a Smart Object

Step 5

Rotate and position the text however you’d like it, against the water. I opted to rotate it a little, so the shot feels a little more natural. 

Rotating and Position the Text

Step 6

Now, set this layer’s Blending Mode to Overlay. You’ll notice that this changes the text’s appearance on the water. 

Setting the Blending Mode to Overlay

2. How to Create an Underwater Effect

Step 1

One of the major goals here is to have the text appear to be affected by the water. We could do this in a number of ways—like using the Warp Tools, Distort Filters… there are plenty of options! However, in this case, let’s try out the Displace Filter

First, select the layer with the water background in it. Click on the thumbnail on the layer to select the content (or press Command-A (on Mac) or Control-A (on PC). 

Now, Create a New Document. Paste this image and Save this document. I called my document „displace.psd”, but you are welcome to call yours whatever you prefer. 

Displace Imagery

Step 2

Now, let’s go back to our original document. 

Select the layer with our Smart Object. Then, select Filter > Distort > Displace

Displace Filter

Step 3

Then, you’ll see this popup dialog box. I went with a Horizontal and Vertical Scale of 10, but I would encourage you to experiment with this! I also chose Stretch to Fit, as I’d like the area to be similar to the original background image we’ve used here. 

When you’re happy with your settings, click OK. Remember, if you don’t like the result, you can always Undo (Control-Z on PC, Command-Z on Mac) and try out different values. I often like to experiment a few times.

Select your displace.psd file created earlier as the file that the Displace Filter will use to create this effect. 

Displace Pop Up Dialog Box

Step 4

And here’s what the text looks like with this effect applied. It’s getting closer to what we want, but it still looks kind of clear, doesn’t it? We’d expect to see some blur here, as the water is between us and the water on the ground.

Let’s apply a Gaussian Blur to this Smart Object. Go to Filter > Blur > Gaussian Blur.

Gaussian Blur

Step 5

I went with 2.0 on the radius here, but you may prefer more or less. I’d recommend something that gives it a little bit of a blur, but also stays legible. A lot of blur might look good, but if we can’t read the text well, that might defeat our purpose.

Click OK when you’re happy with the value you’ve chosen. Remember, you can also undo and try again, if you change your mind.

Gaussian Blur Options

3. How to Add the Finishing Touches

Step 1

So, we’ve got the beginnings of what we’d like to do here—but let’s push it forward and do some more with it. 

Personally, I’d like the text to be darker. We have a few options here. 

I Duplicated the Smart Object Layer twice, leaving the Blending Mode on each set to Overlay. The result was just what I was looking for.

Duplicating Text Layers

Step 2

However, because we put this type into a Smart Object, we can go back and change it any time we like. Double-click on the thumbnail to open up the Smart Object.

You’ll notice that it contains the text as we originally had it in our document. You can make changes here—like the text color or the text itself. Then, when you save it, this will be reflected in our document.

Inside the Smart Object

Step 3

On a side note, keep in mind that these changes might have to be accounted for! For example, changing the color might affect the blending modes—if I make the text light pink, I need to adjust for that (since we worked with a color with a dark value originally). 

In that scenario, I’d just drop my extra Overlay layers and set the Smart Object Layer to Color Burn, Opacity 75%. Voila, we have a similar effect. 

Altering the Smart Object

Step 4

Made any changes that you don’t want to keep? Simply undo! Within the Smart Object, make sure to save any changes. 

To wrap up, I’m going back to the original color and Blending Modes we were working with earlier. 

Original Blending Modes and Color Choices

Step 5

Finally, I wanted to do a little adjustment here. I copied the water Background Layer and brought it to the front of my Layers. Then, I set the Blending Mode to Screen, Opacity 20%. I just wanted to lighten things up a little.

However, I recommend experimenting with Blending Modes—check out how it looks with Color Dodge or Color Burn! Experimenting with Blending Modes is a great way to get more familiar with them. 

Duplicated Water Background Set to Screen

And Now Our Text Is Underwater!

I hope you enjoyed walking through this text effect with me—and I hope you have a lot of fun experimenting with it and making your own underwater text effect Photoshop creations! Again, there are a lot of different ways to distort your text—want to know how to warp text in Photoshop even further? If you’d like to make even more adjustments, I’d recommend taking a look at Edit > Transform > Warp

Thanks for following along with me! Good luck with your creative projects!

underwater text effect photoshop

Love text effects and want to check out more you can experiment with—right now? Check out these other text effects that are ready made and ready to go.

Vintage Text Effects Vol.3

Check out this collection of Vintage Text Effects! There are so many colorful, whimsical, and interesting options to choose from here, perfect for a variety of potential projects. 

Vintage Text Effects

80s Text Effects Vol.1

I don’t know about you, but I love the 80s—and I love these awesome 80s text effects! Check out all the saturated colors, the glam, and the sleek, retro style! I’m already thinking about all the cool things I’d love to try out with these. 

80s Text Effects

Metal Layer Styles – Photoshop Gold Text Effect

These text effects are awesome—and they don’t just come in gold. There’s chrome, bronze, steel… plenty to choose from in these easy-to-use Layer Styles. 

Metal Text Effect

3D Text Effects Vol.3

There are so many fun effects to choose from in this third volume of 3D Text Effects! Easily replace the text with Smart Objects—a snap, right? Check out Volume 1 and Volume 2 for even more effects to try out!

3D Text Effects

100 Photoshop Layer Styles Bundle – Text Effect

This is a giant collection of Photoshop text effects—plenty to play and experiment with! From textured effects and slimy text effects to fire text effects, this one contains a little bit of everything! What an awesome addition to any collection!

100 Text Effects Bundle

If you enjoyed this tutorial, check out these others! Happy creating!

How to Create an Underwater Text Effect in Photoshop

Post pobrano z: How to Create an Underwater Text Effect in Photoshop

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

Water can make for such beautiful, inspiring visuals! In this tutorial, we’ll take some text and visually „place it” underwater—creating a wavy text effect, looking down and into the water, with the text visually beneath. 

What You’ll Need

The followings assets are used within this tutorial:

Now, let’s dig right in and start experimenting with some type! 

1. How to Add Text and Texture to a Document

Step 1

Start with a New Document—any size here will do! 

Keep the scope of your project in mind: are you hoping to create something print ready or something for use online? I’m going to work at 850 x 650 for this example, but you might want to work at a higher resolution, if you’d like to print your work.

Once you’re happy with your settings, click OK.

New Document Example

Step 2

Next, Paste your watery background image into your document. In this case, we’ll be using this Water Stock Photo from Envato Elements, but you could use any image you like!

This is going to be the water that we’ll base our text on. 

Example of Stock Water Imagery

Step 3

Now, let’s add the text. Simply type out whatever text you’d like, using the Text Tool, in your font of choice. In the case of this example, I’ll be using the font Fibre Vintage

Don’t worry about effects or positioning or anything, at this point—just put down the text you’d like first!

I decided to make two different Text Layers. You can make as many as you like. Make the text a dark gray color. 

Example Text

Step 4

Next, make your Text Layer (or Layers) into a Smart Object

To do so, select the applicable Layers, Right-Click (on PC) or Control-Click (on Mac) and select Create Smart Object from the drop-down menu.

We’ll be applying effects to this Smart Object. We’ll be able to more easily preserve and alter the original text this way, if needed.

Creating a Smart Object

Step 5

Rotate and position the text however you’d like it, against the water. I opted to rotate it a little, so the shot feels a little more natural. 

Rotating and Position the Text

Step 6

Now, set this layer’s Blending Mode to Overlay. You’ll notice that this changes the text’s appearance on the water. 

Setting the Blending Mode to Overlay

2. How to Create an Underwater Effect

Step 1

One of the major goals here is to have the text appear to be affected by the water. We could do this in a number of ways—like using the Warp Tools, Distort Filters… there are plenty of options! However, in this case, let’s try out the Displace Filter

First, select the layer with the water background in it. Click on the thumbnail on the layer to select the content (or press Command-A (on Mac) or Control-A (on PC). 

Now, Create a New Document. Paste this image and Save this document. I called my document „displace.psd”, but you are welcome to call yours whatever you prefer. 

Displace Imagery

Step 2

Now, let’s go back to our original document. 

Select the layer with our Smart Object. Then, select Filter > Distort > Displace

Displace Filter

Step 3

Then, you’ll see this popup dialog box. I went with a Horizontal and Vertical Scale of 10, but I would encourage you to experiment with this! I also chose Stretch to Fit, as I’d like the area to be similar to the original background image we’ve used here. 

When you’re happy with your settings, click OK. Remember, if you don’t like the result, you can always Undo (Control-Z on PC, Command-Z on Mac) and try out different values. I often like to experiment a few times.

Select your displace.psd file created earlier as the file that the Displace Filter will use to create this effect. 

Displace Pop Up Dialog Box

Step 4

And here’s what the text looks like with this effect applied. It’s getting closer to what we want, but it still looks kind of clear, doesn’t it? We’d expect to see some blur here, as the water is between us and the water on the ground.

Let’s apply a Gaussian Blur to this Smart Object. Go to Filter > Blur > Gaussian Blur.

Gaussian Blur

Step 5

I went with 2.0 on the radius here, but you may prefer more or less. I’d recommend something that gives it a little bit of a blur, but also stays legible. A lot of blur might look good, but if we can’t read the text well, that might defeat our purpose.

Click OK when you’re happy with the value you’ve chosen. Remember, you can also undo and try again, if you change your mind.

Gaussian Blur Options

3. How to Add the Finishing Touches

Step 1

So, we’ve got the beginnings of what we’d like to do here—but let’s push it forward and do some more with it. 

Personally, I’d like the text to be darker. We have a few options here. 

I Duplicated the Smart Object Layer twice, leaving the Blending Mode on each set to Overlay. The result was just what I was looking for.

Duplicating Text Layers

Step 2

However, because we put this type into a Smart Object, we can go back and change it any time we like. Double-click on the thumbnail to open up the Smart Object.

You’ll notice that it contains the text as we originally had it in our document. You can make changes here—like the text color or the text itself. Then, when you save it, this will be reflected in our document.

Inside the Smart Object

Step 3

On a side note, keep in mind that these changes might have to be accounted for! For example, changing the color might affect the blending modes—if I make the text light pink, I need to adjust for that (since we worked with a color with a dark value originally). 

In that scenario, I’d just drop my extra Overlay layers and set the Smart Object Layer to Color Burn, Opacity 75%. Voila, we have a similar effect. 

Altering the Smart Object

Step 4

Made any changes that you don’t want to keep? Simply undo! Within the Smart Object, make sure to save any changes. 

To wrap up, I’m going back to the original color and Blending Modes we were working with earlier. 

Original Blending Modes and Color Choices

Step 5

Finally, I wanted to do a little adjustment here. I copied the water Background Layer and brought it to the front of my Layers. Then, I set the Blending Mode to Screen, Opacity 20%. I just wanted to lighten things up a little.

However, I recommend experimenting with Blending Modes—check out how it looks with Color Dodge or Color Burn! Experimenting with Blending Modes is a great way to get more familiar with them. 

Duplicated Water Background Set to Screen

And Now Our Text Is Underwater!

I hope you enjoyed walking through this text effect with me—and I hope you have a lot of fun experimenting with it and making your own underwater text effect Photoshop creations! Again, there are a lot of different ways to distort your text—want to know how to warp text in Photoshop even further? If you’d like to make even more adjustments, I’d recommend taking a look at Edit > Transform > Warp

Thanks for following along with me! Good luck with your creative projects!

underwater text effect photoshop

Love text effects and want to check out more you can experiment with—right now? Check out these other text effects that are ready made and ready to go.

Vintage Text Effects Vol.3

Check out this collection of Vintage Text Effects! There are so many colorful, whimsical, and interesting options to choose from here, perfect for a variety of potential projects. 

Vintage Text Effects

80s Text Effects Vol.1

I don’t know about you, but I love the 80s—and I love these awesome 80s text effects! Check out all the saturated colors, the glam, and the sleek, retro style! I’m already thinking about all the cool things I’d love to try out with these. 

80s Text Effects

Metal Layer Styles – Photoshop Gold Text Effect

These text effects are awesome—and they don’t just come in gold. There’s chrome, bronze, steel… plenty to choose from in these easy-to-use Layer Styles. 

Metal Text Effect

3D Text Effects Vol.3

There are so many fun effects to choose from in this third volume of 3D Text Effects! Easily replace the text with Smart Objects—a snap, right? Check out Volume 1 and Volume 2 for even more effects to try out!

3D Text Effects

100 Photoshop Layer Styles Bundle – Text Effect

This is a giant collection of Photoshop text effects—plenty to play and experiment with! From textured effects and slimy text effects to fire text effects, this one contains a little bit of everything! What an awesome addition to any collection!

100 Text Effects Bundle

If you enjoyed this tutorial, check out these others! Happy creating!

How to Create an Underwater Text Effect in Photoshop

Post pobrano z: How to Create an Underwater Text Effect in Photoshop

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

Water can make for such beautiful, inspiring visuals! In this tutorial, we’ll take some text and visually „place it” underwater—creating a wavy text effect, looking down and into the water, with the text visually beneath. 

What You’ll Need

The followings assets are used within this tutorial:

Now, let’s dig right in and start experimenting with some type! 

1. How to Add Text and Texture to a Document

Step 1

Start with a New Document—any size here will do! 

Keep the scope of your project in mind: are you hoping to create something print ready or something for use online? I’m going to work at 850 x 650 for this example, but you might want to work at a higher resolution, if you’d like to print your work.

Once you’re happy with your settings, click OK.

New Document Example

Step 2

Next, Paste your watery background image into your document. In this case, we’ll be using this Water Stock Photo from Envato Elements, but you could use any image you like!

This is going to be the water that we’ll base our text on. 

Example of Stock Water Imagery

Step 3

Now, let’s add the text. Simply type out whatever text you’d like, using the Text Tool, in your font of choice. In the case of this example, I’ll be using the font Fibre Vintage

Don’t worry about effects or positioning or anything, at this point—just put down the text you’d like first!

I decided to make two different Text Layers. You can make as many as you like. Make the text a dark gray color. 

Example Text

Step 4

Next, make your Text Layer (or Layers) into a Smart Object

To do so, select the applicable Layers, Right-Click (on PC) or Control-Click (on Mac) and select Create Smart Object from the drop-down menu.

We’ll be applying effects to this Smart Object. We’ll be able to more easily preserve and alter the original text this way, if needed.

Creating a Smart Object

Step 5

Rotate and position the text however you’d like it, against the water. I opted to rotate it a little, so the shot feels a little more natural. 

Rotating and Position the Text

Step 6

Now, set this layer’s Blending Mode to Overlay. You’ll notice that this changes the text’s appearance on the water. 

Setting the Blending Mode to Overlay

2. How to Create an Underwater Effect

Step 1

One of the major goals here is to have the text appear to be affected by the water. We could do this in a number of ways—like using the Warp Tools, Distort Filters… there are plenty of options! However, in this case, let’s try out the Displace Filter

First, select the layer with the water background in it. Click on the thumbnail on the layer to select the content (or press Command-A (on Mac) or Control-A (on PC). 

Now, Create a New Document. Paste this image and Save this document. I called my document „displace.psd”, but you are welcome to call yours whatever you prefer. 

Displace Imagery

Step 2

Now, let’s go back to our original document. 

Select the layer with our Smart Object. Then, select Filter > Distort > Displace

Displace Filter

Step 3

Then, you’ll see this popup dialog box. I went with a Horizontal and Vertical Scale of 10, but I would encourage you to experiment with this! I also chose Stretch to Fit, as I’d like the area to be similar to the original background image we’ve used here. 

When you’re happy with your settings, click OK. Remember, if you don’t like the result, you can always Undo (Control-Z on PC, Command-Z on Mac) and try out different values. I often like to experiment a few times.

Select your displace.psd file created earlier as the file that the Displace Filter will use to create this effect. 

Displace Pop Up Dialog Box

Step 4

And here’s what the text looks like with this effect applied. It’s getting closer to what we want, but it still looks kind of clear, doesn’t it? We’d expect to see some blur here, as the water is between us and the water on the ground.

Let’s apply a Gaussian Blur to this Smart Object. Go to Filter > Blur > Gaussian Blur.

Gaussian Blur

Step 5

I went with 2.0 on the radius here, but you may prefer more or less. I’d recommend something that gives it a little bit of a blur, but also stays legible. A lot of blur might look good, but if we can’t read the text well, that might defeat our purpose.

Click OK when you’re happy with the value you’ve chosen. Remember, you can also undo and try again, if you change your mind.

Gaussian Blur Options

3. How to Add the Finishing Touches

Step 1

So, we’ve got the beginnings of what we’d like to do here—but let’s push it forward and do some more with it. 

Personally, I’d like the text to be darker. We have a few options here. 

I Duplicated the Smart Object Layer twice, leaving the Blending Mode on each set to Overlay. The result was just what I was looking for.

Duplicating Text Layers

Step 2

However, because we put this type into a Smart Object, we can go back and change it any time we like. Double-click on the thumbnail to open up the Smart Object.

You’ll notice that it contains the text as we originally had it in our document. You can make changes here—like the text color or the text itself. Then, when you save it, this will be reflected in our document.

Inside the Smart Object

Step 3

On a side note, keep in mind that these changes might have to be accounted for! For example, changing the color might affect the blending modes—if I make the text light pink, I need to adjust for that (since we worked with a color with a dark value originally). 

In that scenario, I’d just drop my extra Overlay layers and set the Smart Object Layer to Color Burn, Opacity 75%. Voila, we have a similar effect. 

Altering the Smart Object

Step 4

Made any changes that you don’t want to keep? Simply undo! Within the Smart Object, make sure to save any changes. 

To wrap up, I’m going back to the original color and Blending Modes we were working with earlier. 

Original Blending Modes and Color Choices

Step 5

Finally, I wanted to do a little adjustment here. I copied the water Background Layer and brought it to the front of my Layers. Then, I set the Blending Mode to Screen, Opacity 20%. I just wanted to lighten things up a little.

However, I recommend experimenting with Blending Modes—check out how it looks with Color Dodge or Color Burn! Experimenting with Blending Modes is a great way to get more familiar with them. 

Duplicated Water Background Set to Screen

And Now Our Text Is Underwater!

I hope you enjoyed walking through this text effect with me—and I hope you have a lot of fun experimenting with it and making your own underwater text effect Photoshop creations! Again, there are a lot of different ways to distort your text—want to know how to warp text in Photoshop even further? If you’d like to make even more adjustments, I’d recommend taking a look at Edit > Transform > Warp

Thanks for following along with me! Good luck with your creative projects!

underwater text effect photoshop

Love text effects and want to check out more you can experiment with—right now? Check out these other text effects that are ready made and ready to go.

Vintage Text Effects Vol.3

Check out this collection of Vintage Text Effects! There are so many colorful, whimsical, and interesting options to choose from here, perfect for a variety of potential projects. 

Vintage Text Effects

80s Text Effects Vol.1

I don’t know about you, but I love the 80s—and I love these awesome 80s text effects! Check out all the saturated colors, the glam, and the sleek, retro style! I’m already thinking about all the cool things I’d love to try out with these. 

80s Text Effects

Metal Layer Styles – Photoshop Gold Text Effect

These text effects are awesome—and they don’t just come in gold. There’s chrome, bronze, steel… plenty to choose from in these easy-to-use Layer Styles. 

Metal Text Effect

3D Text Effects Vol.3

There are so many fun effects to choose from in this third volume of 3D Text Effects! Easily replace the text with Smart Objects—a snap, right? Check out Volume 1 and Volume 2 for even more effects to try out!

3D Text Effects

100 Photoshop Layer Styles Bundle – Text Effect

This is a giant collection of Photoshop text effects—plenty to play and experiment with! From textured effects and slimy text effects to fire text effects, this one contains a little bit of everything! What an awesome addition to any collection!

100 Text Effects Bundle

If you enjoyed this tutorial, check out these others! Happy creating!

How to Create an Underwater Text Effect in Photoshop

Post pobrano z: How to Create an Underwater Text Effect in Photoshop

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

Water can make for such beautiful, inspiring visuals! In this tutorial, we’ll take some text and visually „place it” underwater—creating a wavy text effect, looking down and into the water, with the text visually beneath. 

What You’ll Need

The followings assets are used within this tutorial:

Now, let’s dig right in and start experimenting with some type! 

1. How to Add Text and Texture to a Document

Step 1

Start with a New Document—any size here will do! 

Keep the scope of your project in mind: are you hoping to create something print ready or something for use online? I’m going to work at 850 x 650 for this example, but you might want to work at a higher resolution, if you’d like to print your work.

Once you’re happy with your settings, click OK.

New Document Example

Step 2

Next, Paste your watery background image into your document. In this case, we’ll be using this Water Stock Photo from Envato Elements, but you could use any image you like!

This is going to be the water that we’ll base our text on. 

Example of Stock Water Imagery

Step 3

Now, let’s add the text. Simply type out whatever text you’d like, using the Text Tool, in your font of choice. In the case of this example, I’ll be using the font Fibre Vintage

Don’t worry about effects or positioning or anything, at this point—just put down the text you’d like first!

I decided to make two different Text Layers. You can make as many as you like. Make the text a dark gray color. 

Example Text

Step 4

Next, make your Text Layer (or Layers) into a Smart Object

To do so, select the applicable Layers, Right-Click (on PC) or Control-Click (on Mac) and select Create Smart Object from the drop-down menu.

We’ll be applying effects to this Smart Object. We’ll be able to more easily preserve and alter the original text this way, if needed.

Creating a Smart Object

Step 5

Rotate and position the text however you’d like it, against the water. I opted to rotate it a little, so the shot feels a little more natural. 

Rotating and Position the Text

Step 6

Now, set this layer’s Blending Mode to Overlay. You’ll notice that this changes the text’s appearance on the water. 

Setting the Blending Mode to Overlay

2. How to Create an Underwater Effect

Step 1

One of the major goals here is to have the text appear to be affected by the water. We could do this in a number of ways—like using the Warp Tools, Distort Filters… there are plenty of options! However, in this case, let’s try out the Displace Filter

First, select the layer with the water background in it. Click on the thumbnail on the layer to select the content (or press Command-A (on Mac) or Control-A (on PC). 

Now, Create a New Document. Paste this image and Save this document. I called my document „displace.psd”, but you are welcome to call yours whatever you prefer. 

Displace Imagery

Step 2

Now, let’s go back to our original document. 

Select the layer with our Smart Object. Then, select Filter > Distort > Displace

Displace Filter

Step 3

Then, you’ll see this popup dialog box. I went with a Horizontal and Vertical Scale of 10, but I would encourage you to experiment with this! I also chose Stretch to Fit, as I’d like the area to be similar to the original background image we’ve used here. 

When you’re happy with your settings, click OK. Remember, if you don’t like the result, you can always Undo (Control-Z on PC, Command-Z on Mac) and try out different values. I often like to experiment a few times.

Select your displace.psd file created earlier as the file that the Displace Filter will use to create this effect. 

Displace Pop Up Dialog Box

Step 4

And here’s what the text looks like with this effect applied. It’s getting closer to what we want, but it still looks kind of clear, doesn’t it? We’d expect to see some blur here, as the water is between us and the water on the ground.

Let’s apply a Gaussian Blur to this Smart Object. Go to Filter > Blur > Gaussian Blur.

Gaussian Blur

Step 5

I went with 2.0 on the radius here, but you may prefer more or less. I’d recommend something that gives it a little bit of a blur, but also stays legible. A lot of blur might look good, but if we can’t read the text well, that might defeat our purpose.

Click OK when you’re happy with the value you’ve chosen. Remember, you can also undo and try again, if you change your mind.

Gaussian Blur Options

3. How to Add the Finishing Touches

Step 1

So, we’ve got the beginnings of what we’d like to do here—but let’s push it forward and do some more with it. 

Personally, I’d like the text to be darker. We have a few options here. 

I Duplicated the Smart Object Layer twice, leaving the Blending Mode on each set to Overlay. The result was just what I was looking for.

Duplicating Text Layers

Step 2

However, because we put this type into a Smart Object, we can go back and change it any time we like. Double-click on the thumbnail to open up the Smart Object.

You’ll notice that it contains the text as we originally had it in our document. You can make changes here—like the text color or the text itself. Then, when you save it, this will be reflected in our document.

Inside the Smart Object

Step 3

On a side note, keep in mind that these changes might have to be accounted for! For example, changing the color might affect the blending modes—if I make the text light pink, I need to adjust for that (since we worked with a color with a dark value originally). 

In that scenario, I’d just drop my extra Overlay layers and set the Smart Object Layer to Color Burn, Opacity 75%. Voila, we have a similar effect. 

Altering the Smart Object

Step 4

Made any changes that you don’t want to keep? Simply undo! Within the Smart Object, make sure to save any changes. 

To wrap up, I’m going back to the original color and Blending Modes we were working with earlier. 

Original Blending Modes and Color Choices

Step 5

Finally, I wanted to do a little adjustment here. I copied the water Background Layer and brought it to the front of my Layers. Then, I set the Blending Mode to Screen, Opacity 20%. I just wanted to lighten things up a little.

However, I recommend experimenting with Blending Modes—check out how it looks with Color Dodge or Color Burn! Experimenting with Blending Modes is a great way to get more familiar with them. 

Duplicated Water Background Set to Screen

And Now Our Text Is Underwater!

I hope you enjoyed walking through this text effect with me—and I hope you have a lot of fun experimenting with it and making your own underwater text effect Photoshop creations! Again, there are a lot of different ways to distort your text—want to know how to warp text in Photoshop even further? If you’d like to make even more adjustments, I’d recommend taking a look at Edit > Transform > Warp

Thanks for following along with me! Good luck with your creative projects!

underwater text effect photoshop

Love text effects and want to check out more you can experiment with—right now? Check out these other text effects that are ready made and ready to go.

Vintage Text Effects Vol.3

Check out this collection of Vintage Text Effects! There are so many colorful, whimsical, and interesting options to choose from here, perfect for a variety of potential projects. 

Vintage Text Effects

80s Text Effects Vol.1

I don’t know about you, but I love the 80s—and I love these awesome 80s text effects! Check out all the saturated colors, the glam, and the sleek, retro style! I’m already thinking about all the cool things I’d love to try out with these. 

80s Text Effects

Metal Layer Styles – Photoshop Gold Text Effect

These text effects are awesome—and they don’t just come in gold. There’s chrome, bronze, steel… plenty to choose from in these easy-to-use Layer Styles. 

Metal Text Effect

3D Text Effects Vol.3

There are so many fun effects to choose from in this third volume of 3D Text Effects! Easily replace the text with Smart Objects—a snap, right? Check out Volume 1 and Volume 2 for even more effects to try out!

3D Text Effects

100 Photoshop Layer Styles Bundle – Text Effect

This is a giant collection of Photoshop text effects—plenty to play and experiment with! From textured effects and slimy text effects to fire text effects, this one contains a little bit of everything! What an awesome addition to any collection!

100 Text Effects Bundle

If you enjoyed this tutorial, check out these others! Happy creating!

How to Create an Underwater Text Effect in Photoshop

Post pobrano z: How to Create an Underwater Text Effect in Photoshop

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

Water can make for such beautiful, inspiring visuals! In this tutorial, we’ll take some text and visually „place it” underwater—creating a wavy text effect, looking down and into the water, with the text visually beneath. 

What You’ll Need

The followings assets are used within this tutorial:

Now, let’s dig right in and start experimenting with some type! 

1. How to Add Text and Texture to a Document

Step 1

Start with a New Document—any size here will do! 

Keep the scope of your project in mind: are you hoping to create something print ready or something for use online? I’m going to work at 850 x 650 for this example, but you might want to work at a higher resolution, if you’d like to print your work.

Once you’re happy with your settings, click OK.

New Document Example

Step 2

Next, Paste your watery background image into your document. In this case, we’ll be using this Water Stock Photo from Envato Elements, but you could use any image you like!

This is going to be the water that we’ll base our text on. 

Example of Stock Water Imagery

Step 3

Now, let’s add the text. Simply type out whatever text you’d like, using the Text Tool, in your font of choice. In the case of this example, I’ll be using the font Fibre Vintage

Don’t worry about effects or positioning or anything, at this point—just put down the text you’d like first!

I decided to make two different Text Layers. You can make as many as you like. Make the text a dark gray color. 

Example Text

Step 4

Next, make your Text Layer (or Layers) into a Smart Object

To do so, select the applicable Layers, Right-Click (on PC) or Control-Click (on Mac) and select Create Smart Object from the drop-down menu.

We’ll be applying effects to this Smart Object. We’ll be able to more easily preserve and alter the original text this way, if needed.

Creating a Smart Object

Step 5

Rotate and position the text however you’d like it, against the water. I opted to rotate it a little, so the shot feels a little more natural. 

Rotating and Position the Text

Step 6

Now, set this layer’s Blending Mode to Overlay. You’ll notice that this changes the text’s appearance on the water. 

Setting the Blending Mode to Overlay

2. How to Create an Underwater Effect

Step 1

One of the major goals here is to have the text appear to be affected by the water. We could do this in a number of ways—like using the Warp Tools, Distort Filters… there are plenty of options! However, in this case, let’s try out the Displace Filter

First, select the layer with the water background in it. Click on the thumbnail on the layer to select the content (or press Command-A (on Mac) or Control-A (on PC). 

Now, Create a New Document. Paste this image and Save this document. I called my document „displace.psd”, but you are welcome to call yours whatever you prefer. 

Displace Imagery

Step 2

Now, let’s go back to our original document. 

Select the layer with our Smart Object. Then, select Filter > Distort > Displace

Displace Filter

Step 3

Then, you’ll see this popup dialog box. I went with a Horizontal and Vertical Scale of 10, but I would encourage you to experiment with this! I also chose Stretch to Fit, as I’d like the area to be similar to the original background image we’ve used here. 

When you’re happy with your settings, click OK. Remember, if you don’t like the result, you can always Undo (Control-Z on PC, Command-Z on Mac) and try out different values. I often like to experiment a few times.

Select your displace.psd file created earlier as the file that the Displace Filter will use to create this effect. 

Displace Pop Up Dialog Box

Step 4

And here’s what the text looks like with this effect applied. It’s getting closer to what we want, but it still looks kind of clear, doesn’t it? We’d expect to see some blur here, as the water is between us and the water on the ground.

Let’s apply a Gaussian Blur to this Smart Object. Go to Filter > Blur > Gaussian Blur.

Gaussian Blur

Step 5

I went with 2.0 on the radius here, but you may prefer more or less. I’d recommend something that gives it a little bit of a blur, but also stays legible. A lot of blur might look good, but if we can’t read the text well, that might defeat our purpose.

Click OK when you’re happy with the value you’ve chosen. Remember, you can also undo and try again, if you change your mind.

Gaussian Blur Options

3. How to Add the Finishing Touches

Step 1

So, we’ve got the beginnings of what we’d like to do here—but let’s push it forward and do some more with it. 

Personally, I’d like the text to be darker. We have a few options here. 

I Duplicated the Smart Object Layer twice, leaving the Blending Mode on each set to Overlay. The result was just what I was looking for.

Duplicating Text Layers

Step 2

However, because we put this type into a Smart Object, we can go back and change it any time we like. Double-click on the thumbnail to open up the Smart Object.

You’ll notice that it contains the text as we originally had it in our document. You can make changes here—like the text color or the text itself. Then, when you save it, this will be reflected in our document.

Inside the Smart Object

Step 3

On a side note, keep in mind that these changes might have to be accounted for! For example, changing the color might affect the blending modes—if I make the text light pink, I need to adjust for that (since we worked with a color with a dark value originally). 

In that scenario, I’d just drop my extra Overlay layers and set the Smart Object Layer to Color Burn, Opacity 75%. Voila, we have a similar effect. 

Altering the Smart Object

Step 4

Made any changes that you don’t want to keep? Simply undo! Within the Smart Object, make sure to save any changes. 

To wrap up, I’m going back to the original color and Blending Modes we were working with earlier. 

Original Blending Modes and Color Choices

Step 5

Finally, I wanted to do a little adjustment here. I copied the water Background Layer and brought it to the front of my Layers. Then, I set the Blending Mode to Screen, Opacity 20%. I just wanted to lighten things up a little.

However, I recommend experimenting with Blending Modes—check out how it looks with Color Dodge or Color Burn! Experimenting with Blending Modes is a great way to get more familiar with them. 

Duplicated Water Background Set to Screen

And Now Our Text Is Underwater!

I hope you enjoyed walking through this text effect with me—and I hope you have a lot of fun experimenting with it and making your own underwater text effect Photoshop creations! Again, there are a lot of different ways to distort your text—want to know how to warp text in Photoshop even further? If you’d like to make even more adjustments, I’d recommend taking a look at Edit > Transform > Warp

Thanks for following along with me! Good luck with your creative projects!

underwater text effect photoshop

Love text effects and want to check out more you can experiment with—right now? Check out these other text effects that are ready made and ready to go.

Vintage Text Effects Vol.3

Check out this collection of Vintage Text Effects! There are so many colorful, whimsical, and interesting options to choose from here, perfect for a variety of potential projects. 

Vintage Text Effects

80s Text Effects Vol.1

I don’t know about you, but I love the 80s—and I love these awesome 80s text effects! Check out all the saturated colors, the glam, and the sleek, retro style! I’m already thinking about all the cool things I’d love to try out with these. 

80s Text Effects

Metal Layer Styles – Photoshop Gold Text Effect

These text effects are awesome—and they don’t just come in gold. There’s chrome, bronze, steel… plenty to choose from in these easy-to-use Layer Styles. 

Metal Text Effect

3D Text Effects Vol.3

There are so many fun effects to choose from in this third volume of 3D Text Effects! Easily replace the text with Smart Objects—a snap, right? Check out Volume 1 and Volume 2 for even more effects to try out!

3D Text Effects

100 Photoshop Layer Styles Bundle – Text Effect

This is a giant collection of Photoshop text effects—plenty to play and experiment with! From textured effects and slimy text effects to fire text effects, this one contains a little bit of everything! What an awesome addition to any collection!

100 Text Effects Bundle

If you enjoyed this tutorial, check out these others! Happy creating!

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