How to Draw a Star (Multiple Points!)

Post pobrano z: How to Draw a Star (Multiple Points!)

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

Drawing a star may seem simple and overwhelming at the same time. For example, how to construct a five- or a seven-pointed star and make your drawing technically correct? If this theme is something you’re interested in, let’s dive into the fascinating world of stars and geometry.

In this tutorial, I’ll show you the way to design different kinds of stars, from a three-pointed to an eight-pointed one. We’ll use ordinary tools like a ruler, a graphite pencil, compasses, and a protractor.

As a fun bonus, we’ll also explore a way to draw a five-pointed star in a casual way, without any serious measurements.

I recommend following this tutorial from start to finish; every part demonstrates the common basic features, but an understanding of the simpler examples will help you to master more complex methods.

If you’re interested in this type of tutorial, we have a whole series of Geometric Drawing tutorials which you may also enjoy.

What You Will Need

You will need the following equipment to complete this project:

  • a graphite pencil (I recommend using an HB or H type, and please make sure it’s sharp)
  • a pair of compasses
  • a protractor
  • a ruler
  • an eraser
  • an ink pen (an optional tool)
  • drawing paper
The art supplies for this project

1. How to Draw a Three-Pointed Star

Step 1

I mark the central point with a graphite pencil, and then draw a small circle of an arbitrary radius, using the compass. It’s important to leave enough space around this circle.

Keep your pencil marks light, just in case you decide to erase the subsidiary lines later on.

Drawing the small circle

Step 2

I draw a bigger circle, using the central point as a reference.

Adding the bigger circle

Step 3

I draw a straight line that is going upwards from the center of the circumference. If you need perfectly even lines, make sure you use a ruler. 

Adding the vertical line

Step 4

A circle has 360 degrees. To draw a three-pointed star, we should create three equal sectors; 360 divided by 3 is 120.

With a protractor, I construct a sector that has an angle of 120°. The central point and the vertical line are our references for the measurements.

Creating a sector inside the circle

Step 5

I create another sector of the circle with the angle of 120°. Now we have three lines; the points where they meet the bigger circumference are the apexes of our star.

Creating another sector

Step 6

It’s time to divide each sector in two. With the protractor, I find the angles of 60° and mark the segments with dashed lines. 

I also mark the points of intersection where these lines cross the small circle.

Dividing the sectors in half

Step 7

I connect the points with the apexes. Now we have a beautiful three-pointed star!

Connecting the points

Step 8

I outline the contours of the star, using an ink pen. 

This step isn’t obligatory; it’s just useful to emphasize the main lines of the figure. You can erase all subsidiary pencil lines or leave them—it’s completely up to you.

The three-pointed star outlined with black ink

2. How to Draw a Four-Pointed Star

Step 1

I draw a small circle of an arbitrary radius, using a pencil and a compass.

Drawing the small circle

Step 2

I add a bigger circle that is encircling the existing one.

Drawing the bigger circle

Step 3

I add a straight vertical line going from the center of the circle.

Drawing the vertical line

Step 4

With the protractor, I find a 90° angle and create the first sector.

Creating the first sector

I add two more lines, based on the same method; now we have four sectors, each with an angle of 90°. The points where the lines cross the bigger circumference are the apexes of our star.

All sectors are in place

Step 5

Let’s divide each sector in half. To do that, I find the angle of 45° within each sector and mark the new segments with dashed lines.

I also mark the points of intersection, where these lines cross the small circle.

Dividing each sector in half

Step 6

I connect the points with the apexes, using straight lines. The four-pointed star is complete!

The shape of the star is complete

Step 7

I outline the contours of the star, using the ink pen.

The star is complete

3. How to Draw a Five-Pointed Star

Step 1

I mark the central point with a pencil, and then draw a relatively big circle of an arbitrary radius, using the compass.

Drawing the circumference

Step 2

I add a vertical line that is going from the central point of the circle.

Adding the straight line

Step 3

Let’s find the first sector with a protractor; its angle should be 72°.

Finding the first sector

Using the same principle, I add more lines. Now we have five sectors; the points where the lines cross the circumference will be the apexes of our star.

I also name these points with letters, just to simplify the process and make it visually clear.

All sectors are in place

Step 4

I connect the points A and B with a straight line.

Connecting the points

Step 5

I connect the points A and C with a line.

Joining the points with a line

Step 6

In the same manner, I join the point B and the point D.

Connecting the points

Step 7

I connect the point E with the points D and C. The shape is complete!

Completing the shape

Step 8

With an ink pen, I outline the contours of the star, and then erase the unnecessary captions.

Outlining the contoursa of the star

4. How to Draw a Six-Pointed Star

Step 1

I mark the central point and draw a relatively big circle of an arbitrary radius, using the compass.

Drawing the circumference

Step 2

I add a straight vertical line from the center of the circle.

Drawing a vertical line

Step 3

To draw a six-pointed star, we need to create six equal sectors, each with an angle of 60°.

I create the first sector, using the protractor.

Drawing the first sector

I add the sectors, using the same principle, and name the points of intersection with letters.

All sectors are in place

Step 4

I connect the points A and B.

Connecting the points

Step 5

Now I connect the points B and C.

Connecting another pair of points

Step 6

I connect another pair of points, this time A and C. Now we have a triangle.

Joining the points

Step 7

I connect the points D and E with a straight line.

Connecting the points

Step 8

I join the points E and F.

Joining the points

Step 9

I connect the points D and F; now we have another triangle, and the shape of the hexagram is complete.

The basic shape is complete

Step 10

I outline the contours of the star with black ink pen lines.

The shape of the star outlined with ink pen

Step 11

By the way, there is another method of drawing a six-pointed star, this time without a protractor. Let’s try this option!

I draw a circumference of an arbitrary radius, using the compass.

Drawing the circle

Step 12

I add the lines (a vertical and a horizontal one) that are going right through the central point of the circle. Let’s agree that the upper point of intersection is the point A.

Drawing the lines

Step 13

Put the needle point of your compass right into the point A, and measure the distance between this point and the center of the circle.

Then, without removing the needle point, measure the same distance on the circumference. You’ll get the point C on the right side and the point B on the left side. 

Repeat this action several times, shifting the needle point of the compass, and name the points you get with letters.

Measuring the distance and finding the points

Step 14

I connect the points A and D, A and E, and D and E with straight lines. Now we have the first triangle.

Connecting the points

Step 15

I connect the points B and C, C and F, and F and B with straight lines. We get the second triangle, and the star is complete!

Another six-pointed star is complete

5. How to Draw a Seven-Pointed Star

Step 1

I draw a circumference of an arbitrary radius, using the compass.

Drawing the circle

Step 2

I draw a straight vertical line that is going downwards from the central point of the circle.

Adding the vertical line

Step 3

When 360 is divided by 7, we get a fractional number, so we have to pick the closest value (51°). I create a set of sectors that have angles of 51°, using the vertical line as a reference.

I also name the points of intersection with letters.

Creating sectors

Step 4

I connect the point A with the points B and C.

Connecting the points

Step 5

I join the points B and D.

Joining another pair of points

Step 6

I connect the points D and E.

Connecting the points

Step 7

I join the points E and F.

Connecting the points

Step 8

I connect the points F and G.

Joining the points

Step 9

I connect the points G and C. The shape is complete!

Completing the shape of the star

Step 10

I outline the contours of the heptagram, using the ink pen.

The seven-pointed star is complete

6. How to Draw an Eight-Pointed Star

Step 1

I draw a circumference of an arbitrary radius, using the compass.

Drawing the circle

Step 2

I add a straight vertical line that is going upwards from the center of the circle.

Drawing the vertical line

Step 3

360 divided by 8 is 45, so we have to construct the sectors that have angles of 45° each. I create the first sector, using the existing vertical line as a reference.

Creating the first 45 degrees sector

I complete the set of sectors and name the points of intersection.

All sectors are in place

Step 4

I connect the points A and D with a straight line.

Connecting the first pair of points

Step 5

I connect the points D and G.

Connecting the points

Step 6

I join the points G and B.

Connecting the points

Step 7

I connect the points B and E.

Joining the points

Step 8

I connect the points E and H. Do you foresee where the next line will be?

Joining the points

Step 9

I join the points H and C.

Connecting the points

Step 10

I connect the points C and F.

Joining the points

Step 11

I connect the points F and A. The octagram is complete!

The basic shape is complete

Step 12

I outline the contours of the star with ink lines. 

The star is complete

7. How to Draw a Five-Pointed Star in a Casual Way

Step 1

Are you tired of making calculations and measuring everything? The serious part is over, so let’s relax and draw a pentagram in a casual way.

I draw a straight inclined line, using a pencil and a ruler. You can use a ruler, too, or draw the lines just by hand.

Drawing the first line

Step 2

I draw another inclined line, starting from the top point of the existing one. Now we have a contour resembling an upturned “v” letter.

Adding another line

Step 3

I add another line going to the left-hand side.

Adding the third line

Step 4

I add a straight horizontal line.

Adding a horizontal line

Step 5

I complete the shape of the star, connecting the points with a finishing line.

By the way, it’s possible to draw a star following the same method, by marking all five points beforehand and then connecting them with lines.

The star is complete

Your Drawings Are Complete

Congratulations—you did it! Now you can draw different kinds of stars. I hope the compass and protractor became your best friends, and together you’ll create many more geometrical objects.

Creating technically perfect figures requires skill and patience, so if your stars came out slightly uneven at the first attempt, don’t give up—just try again. Sometimes the tools we use allow imperfections, like the inaccuracy of the protractor’s grid.

At the same time, remember to have fun and enjoy the process! 

The result of our work